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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 436
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 436. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2646.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 436. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2646

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 436, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2646.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 436
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_457.jpg
Transcript 436 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. along sulphur spring valleys, had a deep moat, which is nearly filled up with debris and sand. Outside of the northern wall is a cemetery containing several tower-like tombs, and a vast number of subterranean vaults, whose existence can only be known by the undulating moundlike character of the surface. Similar tombs exist in the Necropolis on the south side. We now turn our attention to what constitute one of the most interesting and striking features in the ruins of Palmyra—the mausoleums, or tower sepulchres. One of the most beautiful towers stands in the glen, or Wady el Kubur, near the road to Kuryetein. It is a square tower, thirty feet on each side, and about eighty feet high, divided into four stories, and slightly tapering (see page 425). The door is ornamented w7ith pediment and moulding, and half-way up is a bilingual inscription on a slab, above which is a bracket with two winged figures, and surmounted by a canopy. Entering the door wre find ourselves in a chamber twenty-seven feet by ten, and twenty feet high. On each side are four fluted Corinthian pilasters, with tiers of loculi between them. Opposite the door is a recess containing five busts in relief, each having a short Palmyrene inscription, giving the name and parentage of the person represented. Over the cornice of the recess is a projecting slab, above which are four other busts with inscriptions. The interior of the doorway is ornamented with pilasters, and has a large bust over it. To the left of the door is a narrow staircase leading to the upper stories, and above the door to the staircase are five busts in two rows. The ceiling is beautiful, consisting of heavy slabs of stone, panelled and painted. Each of the central lacunars has a bust on a blue ground, and each of the outer ones a white flower in relief. The colours are fresh as those in the subterranean tombs of the Sidon Necropolis, but the busts are mutilated, as they are wherever Muslim iconoclasm has sway. The mode of burial would seem to have been to embalm the body, place it in one of the loculi, and seal up the opening. Wood found in one of the tombs a mummy in all respects similar to those in the land of the Pharaohs, and fragments of mummy linen and winding- sheets soaked in tar have been discovered here recently, like those in the tombs of Egypt. This building is a fair specimen of the mausoleums of Palmyra, of which more than one hundred can be seen along the mountain slopes and on the plains, a few of them entire, but the greater part in ruins. The inscriptions on them are generally in the Palmyrene character only, though not a few are bilingual, having a Greek translation appended. On the tower above described is a Greco-Palmyrene inscription stating that it was built as a family tomb by Elabelos in the Seleucian year 414 (a.d. 102) (see page 425). A similar inscription on another tower records its erection by Gichos in the year 314 (a.d. 2). Three of these tower sepulchres are called palaces by the Arabs. One is Kosr el 'Arus (" Palace of the Bride "), another Kosr ez Zeineh (" Palace of Zeineh," a girl's name, or, if it be Zineh, " Palace of Ornament "), and the third Kosr el 'Azba, or " Palace of the Maiden," which is adorned with the bust of a woman holding one of her own shoulders. The hill to the south-west of the city is called Tell es Sitt Balkis (" Hill of the Lady Balkis, Queen of Sheba"), the only name in Palmyra which connects it with the a^e of Solomon. The Arabs claim that the Queen of Sheba was named