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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 433
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 433. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 433. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2643

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 433, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 433
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_454.jpg
Transcript PALMYRA. 433 Tl - wonder in these ancient ruins is, not that so much has fallen, but that anything There were, according to Wood, four rows of columns, between which ran the three remains. Each column, consisting of three courses of stone admirably jointed, was fifty-seven 1 Vh including the base and capital, and most of the columns have corbels or brackets projecting from them for supporting statues (see pages 427 and 435). This was evidently the umental avenue of this Athens of the East, and the Palmyrenes here erected statues to tl eir distinguished men, the inscriptions below giving the name of the individual. From one f the inscriptions it is clear that the chronological era in use in Palmyra was that of the Seleucidae, 312 b.c. The colonnade is not built in a straight line, but curves slightly in the middle. This must have riven it a peculiar effect when seen from a distance, or when observed by the crowds who thronged its avenues in the palmy clays of the Queen of the East. At the curve or bend in the middle stand four square piers or bases, supposed to have been surmounted by colossal statues, or to have formed the foundations for a vaulted tetrapylon, Standing as they do at the intersection of another colonnade running at right-angles with it. On the south side are rows of columns, which may have been connected with a forum. To the of Dur 'Adlah, in the main colonnade, is a column bearing on its top another smaller column. Other smaller colonnades lead off in various directions to the numerous temples and other buildings that occupy the space around the grand colonnade. This is supposed to have formed a purely ornamental part of the town, the promenade or boulevard of this Palm City of the Desert. It seems difficult to realise, in this painful solitude, this voiceless ruin, where only a few Arab peasants mope drearily about, eking out a scanty subsistence from their little gardens and their flocks, that here once ebbed and flowed the surging tide of human activity, that these streets were thronged with merchants, civilians, Roman soldiers, Persian carpet dealers, Indian traders, and Greeks, Syrians, Bedawin Arabs, and Egyptians, who made this city the mart of the East, the highway of the nations, and the centre of business life. A fine Corinthian colunin, erected as a monument to Alilamos, in the year 450 (a.d. 138), by the senate and people, stands alone a few hundred yards north of the Triumphal Arch e page 434). The date and name are recorded in a long Greek inscription on the pedestal. A similar column stands one-quarter of an hour south-west of the Temple of the Sun, near a stream flowing from a sulphur fountain. On the portico of one of the temples, of which there are three north of the colonnade, is a -)rew inscription, showing that it may have been a synagogue, though there is no other ication of that colony of Jews visited here by Benjamin of Tudela in the twelfth century, n numbering four thousand, and supposed to have lived here from the time of Solomon. >ou pass westward from the tetrapylon a wilderness of columns surrounds you. Here lnge column, there a group of two or three, and farther on the traces of colonnades. mg down again from the citadel, you see on the north of the city the ancient wall known 56