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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 432
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 432. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 432. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2641

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 432, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 432
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_452.jpg
Transcript 432 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. This building, a peripteros standing on a raised platform, is one hundred and thirty-four feet in length exclusive of the colonnade, and is believed to be unique in design. Around the shrine stood a single row of fluted Corinthian columns, sixty-four feet high, with bronze capitals, above which was an unbroken entablature, whose frieze was ornamented with boldly carved festoons of fruit and flowers, supported at intervals by winged figures. The capitals are now gone, as bronze was an article too valuable not to be coveted and too portable not to be carried away. The doorway is not, as usual, in the centre of the building, but between two columns in the west side, and opposite to the main door of the court; and in front of it, within the building, is the entrance to the cell. This exquisitely sculptured portal is thirty-three feet high by fifteen feet wide, and on the soffit is an eagle with outspread wings, similar to those at Ba'albek and Husn Suleiman. It is on a starred ground, flanked by genii. The wall is pierced with windows, between which are pilasters opposite the columns, and at each end are two Ionic semi-columns. The roof of the temple is entirely gone, as is that of the Ba albek temples, and the roof of the mosque standing within it is supported by roughly built arches. At each extremity of the building is a semicircular vaulted chamber, with a richly sculptured monolithic roof. The chamber in the northern apse has the signs of the Zodiac carved in relief around the periphery of a circle, within which, carved in seven pentagons, are busts in high relief of what seem to have been figures of the principal deities. On the south side is the mihrab, or kibleh, of the mosque. From the summit of the wall one can obtain a fine view of the temple, the triple arch, and the distant castle, and the imagination may reconstruct the splendid temple with the immense court and elegant colonnade. It cannot boast of marble columns, of which we read in so many books of travel, for there is not a marble shaft or capital in Palmyra. The temples were all built of the white compact limestone from the adjacent hills. Near the triumphal arch there are, however, four syenite columns, one of which is thirty feet in length and three feet in diameter (see page 427). The most striking object in Palmyra, as you look down from the Saracenic castle on the north-western mountain, is the Grand Colonnade. This is the wonder of travellers and the artist's delight (see pages 427 and 435). When entire, with its one thousand five hundred white columns standing, its elegant entablature fading away in airy perspective for a distance of four thousand feet, with its central and side avenues, its intersecting colonnades and porticoes, and its triumphal arch flanked on both sides by temples and palatial dwellings, it must have been the perfection of architectural beauty. Between the temple and the arch was the marketplace, or central square of the city, and on a column here there has been found the votive inscription of the leader of a commercial caravan. The Triumphal Gateway, with three arches, the central arch being thirty-four feet high, is adorned with an excess of sculptured decoration, more Oriental than Grecian in its profuseness (see page 434). In the amount of minute detail, it reminds one of the temples of Northern India. The keystone of this central arch has subsided about a foot, and threatens to