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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 430
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 430. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2639.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 430. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2639

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 430, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2639.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 430
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_450.jpg
Transcript 430 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. refreshing to the eye, but that interesting people, the Bedawin Arabs, who have held sway over the surrounding country since the days of Abraham, are at that season on their good behaviour, and may be seen at the best advantage (see pages 424 and 425). They are then returning westward and northward to the settled region from their wintering in the east and south, and it is for their interest to maintain friendly relations with the fellahin, and not to involve themselves in trouble with the Turkish military authorities. A small Turkish garrison occupied Tudmiir a few years since, under a military mudir, but this official generally remains at Kuryetein (or "two towns "), from whence horsemen can be readily obtained. The journey to Palmyra from Kuryetein can be made by leaving that place at 1 p.m., carrying wTater in flasks for drinking purposes, resting half an hour at sunset, then riding till midnight and resting three hours, when the final stage of eight hours is accomplished by 11 A.M. After riding eleven hours the second day, we find the ranges of hills which border the broad valley suddenly approaching each other, the southern mountain sweeping to the north-east across the mouth of the valley. On the sides to the right and left are square towers. Some are low down, others on the summit of hills. These are the tower sepulchres of Palmyra (see page 425), and as we emerge from the valley we see in the distance, on the top of the high northern hills, the castle, which commands the whole plateau of the City of Palms. From the wrest end of the castle (see page 435) we are almost exactly in a line with the Great Colonnade, which seems in the distance like a forest of giant trees, stripped of their branches and bark by some fierce cyclone, and standing gaunt and naked against the sky. On every side are ruins, broken temples, towers, columns, tombs, and walls, in a tumultuous sea of stony fragments; and in the eastern extremity rises the stately Temple of the Sun, the finest ruin in Palmyra, and for extent and grandeur second to none in Syria. Standing on a rising ground, near the south-eastern end of the town, its appearance when entire must have been most impressive. Its projecting base, or krepis, of massive rough-hewn stones is surmounted by a smooth-cut wall with a range of thirteen Corinthian pilasters, not less than thirty feet high, above which is a plain frieze and cornice. Between the pilasters are richly carved windows with pediments, of which no less than thirteen can still be counted on the north side. These are flanked by lofty pilasters sixty-eight feet in height, the three corner ones on each side being higher and larger than the rest, and projecting so as to form corner towers to the walls. Of the other three sides the foundations only are ancient, the superstructure being the work of the Arabs, who used the temple as a fortress. On the western side a magnificent triple gateway formed the entrance to this grand court, approached by a broad flight of steps. The portico of ten columns is gone, but the monolithic sides and lintel of the central door still remain, ornamented with rich sculptures of vine branches, clusters of grapes, and flowers. This door was thirty-two feet high and sixteen wide, but has been disfigured and almost concealed by a huge square Saracenic tower built by the Muslims, who also constructed a moat around the entire external wall.