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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 426
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 426. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2635.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 426. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2635

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 426, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2635.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 426
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_446.jpg
Transcript 426 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. E. H. Palmer, the most recent translator of the Koran (1880), says that the claim of the Koran to miraculous eloquence, however absurd it may sound to Western ears, was and is to the Arab incontrovertible, and he accounts for the immense influence which it has always exercised upon the Arab mind, by the fact that " it consists not merely of the enthusiastic utterances of an individual, but of the popular sayings, choice pieces of eloquence, and favourite legends current among the desert tribes for ages before this time." *£> PRESENT CONDITION OF DAMASCUS. In modern times we know very well the meaning of the term " railroad centre." Business, enterprise, and men from all parts of the land combine to give to such places unusual interest. But even in the far East, where the currents of life are thought to be more sluggish, great centres of traffic and travel exist to-day; and have existed from the earliest times. It was on account of commercial interests that Tadmor, now known as Palmyra, sprang up in the desert. Damascus was bordered by the desert on two of its sides ; yet, in regard to the matter we are now considering, it does not rank second to any city of the Old World. One great route led west to Tyre and the sea-coast. Another led south-west to Jerusalem and Egypt. Another led south through the rich countries of Bashan, Ammon, Moab, and Edom, to the Gulf of 'Akaba, passing the lines running at right-angles to it, which led to the Persian Gulf in one direction and to the Red Sea in another. A fourth route led north-west and north to the kingdoms of Karkor, Hamath, and Halman, or Aleppo. A fifth led north-east, past Palmyra to Nineveh, on the Tigris. A sixth led directly east across the desert to Babylon ; while a seventh probably led south-east past Salchad, reaching the head of the Persian Gulf through the northern part of Arabia. That news, merchandise, and men from all parts of the world should be found here, wTould be inevitable. This would be true through all the centuries from the time of Christ back to the days of Abraham. The arrival and departure of immense caravans was a sight with which the people of Damascus were constantly familiar from its earliest history. Besides the peaceful caravans of merchants and travellers, they witnessed not infrequently also the passing of victorious armies, or the sad spectacle of an army of captives that were being transported from one country to another, at the caprice of some despot at Nineveh or Babylon. At the present time several of the ancient routes which we have indicated are traversed by caravans, but those leading to Mecca and Bagdad are by far the most important. The time between Damascus and Bagdad is about twelve days, which allows two days for rest at the watering-stations. The distance is nearly five hundred miles. The overland mail to India goes by this route, and it is taken by a few travellers who wish to save time or to avoid a long journey by sea. The special danger in crossing the desert arises from the Bedouins, who sometimes plunder the caravans, although in recent years this has not often happened. While the modern yearly caravan to Mecca probably does not rival in numbers or importance some of those that Damascus witnessed when, centuries before Christ, she was " the