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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 422
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 422. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 422. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2631

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 422, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 422
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_442.jpg
Transcript 422 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. MOHAMMEDAN WORSHIP. Mohammedan worship is very simple, and resembles that of the Jewish synagogue. It consists of prayer, reading of the Koran, and preaching. The second commandment is strictly understood as an absolute prohibition of all image-worship and of all representations of living creatures, whether in churches or elsewhere. The Arabesque is the only ornament allowed, and always taken from inanimate nature. The mosques, like Catholic churches, are always open and frequented by worshippers, who perform their devotions either alone or in groups with covered heads and bare feet. In entering, one must take off his shoes, remembering the command, " Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground." There are five stated seasons for prayer—at daybreak, near noon, in the afternoon, a little after sunset (to avoid the appearance of sun-worship), and at nightfall, besides two night prayers for extra devotion. The mueddin, or muezzin (crier), announces the time of devotion from the minaret of the mosque by chanting the " Adan," or call to prayer, in these words : " God is most great. I testify that there is no deity but God. I testify that Mohammed is God's apostle. Come to prayer ! Come to security ! Prayer is better than sleep ! God is most great! There is no deity but God!" (See page 385.) A devout Mussulman is never ashamed to perform his devotion in public -whether at home, or in the mosque, or in the street, or on board the ship. Regardless of the surroundings, feeling alone with God in the midst of the crowd, he spreads his rug, goes through his genuflexions and prostrations, his face turned to Mecca, his hands now raised to heaven, then laid on the lap, his forehead touching the ground, and repeats the first surah of the Koran, and the ninety-nine beautiful names of Allah, which form his rosary. The mosques are as well filled wTith men as many Christian churches are with women. Islam is a religion for men ; women are of no account; the education and elevation of the female sex would destroy the system. With all its simplicity and gravity, the Mohammedan worship has also its frantic excitements of the dancing and howling dervishes, who equal the ascetic excesses of the ancient Christian hermits and the modern Indian fakirs. On the celebration of the birthday of their prophet and other festivals they work themselves, by the constant repetition of " Allah ! Allah ! " into a state of unconscious ecstasy, " in which they plant swords in their breasts, tear live serpents with their teeth, eat bottles of glass, and finally lie prostrate on the ground for the chief of their order to ride on horseback over their bodies." THE KORAN. The Koran is the Bible of the Mohammedans. It is unquestionably one of the great books of the world. It is not a book only, but an institution, a code of civil and religious laws, claiming divine origin and authority. It has left its impress upon ages. It feeds to this day the devotions, and regulates the private and public life, of more than a hundred millions