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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 419
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 419. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2628.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 419. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2628

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 419, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2628.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 419
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_439.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. ■ 419 nd the Templars. The character of these orders underwent a decisive change during t The religious austerity which marked their origin was lost and supplanted by a the contest. o • chivalry which soon became the ideal of every knight in Europe. But this change the direct result of an imitation of Saladin. Notwithstanding his striking resemblance to the national genius of the Arabs, he was no A 1 either by birth or by education. He was born, 1137, at Tekrit, on the Tigris, and was K rd bv descent; and he was educated under the tutelage of his uncle, Shirkah, in the rvice of the ruler of Northern Syria, Nureddin. But the principal force active in forming his character was his religion and not his race. He is a typical instance of what the Koran can make out of human nature, not through its faith but through its poesy, not through its fanaticism but through its chivalry. He stands in the same relation to Islam as the Templar or the Hospitaller to Christianity. On March 4, 1193, Saladin died at Damascus. When he felt that his time was running out fast, he ordered his standard-bearer to descend into the streets, carrying his winding-sheet on a high pole, and crying out to the people, " Lo, this is all that remains of the great Saladin ! " There was truth in that, for the whole political fabric which he had reared burst to pieces immediately after his death. Something more, though, than his winding-sheet remained of him a moral influence which it is still interesting to study, a brilliant name which still kindles a wide enthusiasm, and a tomb which is still admired as a fine specimen of Moslem art. THE CAMEL. The camel is fitly called " the ship of the desert." It is admirably adapted for its use on the boundless ocean of sand from the Nile to the Euphrates. It has needed no repair since the days of Abraham, and could not be improved by any invention in navigation. It would be as impossible to cross the waterless desert without this wonderful animal as to cross the ocean without a ship. No horse or donkey would answer the purpose. The camel has the reputation of patient endurance and passive submission, which some, however, deny, or regard as mere stupidity. It carries the heaviest burdens on its single or double hump, which is its natural pack-saddle. The Bactrian camel of Central Asia has two humps, the Arabian camel, or dromedary, which is used in Egypt and the Sinaitic Peninsula, has one hump. The very name of the camel means burden-bearer. It can travel five (some nine, or even fifteen) days in scorching heat without water, and resorts to its inside or cistern, which, at the sacrifice of its own life, has saved the life of many a traveller. s on barley, dry beans, and chopped straw while in camp, and on the prickly thistles thorns of the wilderness, which, much to the annoyance of the rider, it snatches from Me and leisurely chews as a positive luxury. It supplies its master with milk, fuel, ■ and garments; and, having done its duty, it leaves its bleached skeleton in the arid a landmark to future travellers. With peculiar gurgling growls or sighs of protest, - sound of any other animal, the camel goes down on its knees in four distinct it lies flat on its belly; growling, it receives its burden; growling, it gets up by