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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 415
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 415. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2625.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 415. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2625

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 415, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2625.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 415
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_436.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 415 \ The memory of Naaman is perpetuated on the banks of the Abana in a leper —14/' • 1 which occupies the site of his house. " I have often visited it," says Dr. Porter, 1 hen looking on its miserable inmates, all disfigured and mutilated by their loathsome X e I could not wonder that the heart of the little Jewish captive was moved by her master's sufferings." In "^2 b.c. the kingdom of Damascus lost its independence through Tiglath-pileser. The oohecy of Isaiah was fulfilled : "The kingdom shall cease from Damascus, and the remnant ,f Syria" (Isa. xvii. I, 3). Alexander the Great conquered Syria (b.c. 333). After various fortunes it was made a Roman province (b.c. 63). At the time of Christ Damascus had several Jewish synagogues. In the Byzantine Empire it became the residence of a Christian bishop, next in rank to the patriarch of Antioch, and numbered several churches and a cathedral in honour of John the Baptist. In a.d. 634 Damascus fell into the hands of Islam. The conquerors promised the Christians security of life and property and freedom of faith, but took from them first the half and afterwards the whole of the cathedral. Moawyah, the first khalif of the Omeiyades (a.i>. 661), made Damascus the capital of the Mohammedan empire, and raised it to great splendour. During the Crusades it shared the changing fortunes and misfortunes of the cities in the Holy Land. The famous Saladin made it his head-quarters in his expeditions against the Franks. The Cross never displaced the Crescent. In a.d. 1516 Damascus passed into the possession of the Turkish Sultan, and has remained ever since a provincial capital of Turkey. In Damascus there have been some terrible examples of religious fanaticism. Every one remembers the frightful massacre of July, i860, when at least 2,500 adult male Christians were murdered in cold blood. Abd el Kader, the Algerian ex-chief, who still lives there in honourable exile, a vigorous old man of seventy years, behaved nobly on that occasion, and with his retinue saved the lives of many hundreds, while the pasha and the Turkish officials did not move a hand. The venerable Rev. S. Robson, of the Irish Protestant Mission, who was in Damascus during these days of terror, gave us a description of the tragedy. His colleague, the Rev. W llliam Graham, was treacherously murdered while attempting to save another, and Mr. Robson himself was only spared by seeking refuge in the house of a Mohammedan. The christian quarter still bears traces of the terrible destruction to which it was then exposed. It is an honour to France that she sent a corps of ten thousand men to Syria in the terest of humanity and Christianity. Since then the admirable road from Beirut to Damascus ^vas built by a French company, and a daily diligence established. A Christian governor was the same time secured for the Lebanon district, to the great advantage of the people. Thus "the wrath of man" was overruled for good Th • ne most important event which took place in Damascus, and one of the most important istory of mankind, is the conversion of St. Paul, the greatest of missionaries and the