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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 414
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 414. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2624.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 414. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2624

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 414, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2624.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 414
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_435.jpg
Transcript 4i4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. in this manner is welcome and refreshing to a person who is worn down by the long- continued heat. With these may be mentioned the bakers' shops. The ovens are curious, as well as the method tff making and baking the bread, which is sold in shops, on stands in the streets (see page 383), or by boys who carry it about on large trays (see page 421). The cries of these vendors of bread would seem strange to other people, for among them one hears such as these: 11 O God, send a customer! " or, " Going for one cent!" A class that attracted our attention were the pigeon-fanciers. These persons are numerous, and they possess a kind of stock-exchange, where they meet for the transaction of business. In former times communication between Damascus and Bagdad by means of pigeons was extensively carried on, and one of the numerous breed still existing here derives his name from this ancient custom. Pigeon-fanciers are supposed to be incapacitated from giving testimony in a court of law, because their business leads them into special temptations to theft; and, furthermore, it is thought that they yield to the opportunity afforded them of viewing from their lofts the harems of the surrounding houses. Hence, although numerous, they are not regarded as a very respectable class. No detailed descriptions of these bazaars can be here attempted ; but, as we pass from one to another, we witness on every hand, either in the streets or by the wayside, the strangest sights. The barber seems to be always busy (see page 417). Unlike those with us, the Damascus barber has with his regular business an associated branch, namely, that of bleeding, a practice of which we hear little in modern times. At another point, the cafe by the roadside will certainly afford a place for rest, if one is weary, and for such refreshment as coffee and pipes can give. The busy proprietor will be found to be genial and pleasant, and inspired by a desire to entertain his guests in the most courteous manner (see page 383). Farther on we find ourselves in front of a great plane-tree, which is nearly forty feet in circumference, and which, on account of its size and age, seems out of place where it stands, and leaves one to wonder how it can have survived for so many centuries. In the shadow of its trunk and underneath its branches, which serve as a roof, workmen carry on their trades (see page 407). Damascus is, as we have previously stated, one of the oldest cities in the world. Josephus affirms that it was founded by Uz, the son of Aram. It was known in the days of the patriarchs, for Abraham's trusted servant Eliezer, was from Damascus (Gen. xv. 2). It is often mentioned in the Old Testament, in the Acts of the Apostles, and twice in the Epistles of Paul (Gal. j. 17; 2 Cor. xi. 32). David conquered the city after a bloody war (2 Sam. viii. 5, 6), but under Solomon an adventurer made himself king of Damascus, and founded an empire with which the Israelites came thenceforth often into violent conflict. An interesting episode is the healing of Naaman, the Syrian general, from leprosy by the prophet Elisha, to whom his attention was directed by a Jewish captive maid (2 Kings