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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 409
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 409. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2619.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 409. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2619

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 409, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2619.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 409
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_430.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 409 1 r kawasses. The bazaar is wide, lofty, and well built, but it does not extend far. oached by a broad flight of steps descending from the bazaar of the silk and linen /see pa°"e 396). The shops are deep recesses about five feet wide and seven and , if hio-h ranged close together nearly three feet above the footway. In these cosy-looking • h the booksellers were seated at their ease on mats^pr carpets, reading or conversing with tomer and watching the passers-by, while the bookbinders, kneeling at their tool chests, •hich served as benches, were busy at work. I found that there were twelve booksellers, five 4 whom were bookbinders. I soon got into interesting conversation with an occupant of one >f the shops, a thoughtful-looking elderly man who was smoking a nargileh and fingering a rosary made of Mekka date-stones. He replied to my questions with grave courtesy, and watched me curiously while I made notes and sketches. I saw a great many printed books from the Cairo and Bagdad printing-presses, and a few MS. copies of the Koran, one old and the others quite modern. He showed me several newly written pocket prayer-books, for which he said there was a great demand, as even people who cannot read like to possess them. I areful not to touch anything that he did not himself place in my hand. He handed me one of these; it measured four inches by three, and contained fourteen leaves of paper like fine vellum, on which the prayers were neatly written between carefully ruled indented lines. The price of the book well bound in leather was ten piastres, or unbound five piastres (about one shilling). There were inferior copies which were cheaper. The side walls of his shop were adorned with sacred monograms, pious ejaculations, and short prayers, printed on paper in very characters, for the use of house-decorators, to trace on the walls of mosques, shrines, and dwelling-houses. W hen I took leave of my kind entertainer, and thanked him for his courtesy, he said, 1 have been welcome, O lady," and he good-naturedly volunteered to write his name, " Mohammed el Mufty el Katiby," in my note-book. On another occasion when I went to this bazaar he led me to the shop of Et Tayyib, one of the best bookbinders, who subsequently ►ound several books for me, and I was permitted to see every kind of tool and to take rubbings every one of the brass dies used by the workers in this bazaar. Some of these were very beautiful. he native Christian communities are now well supplied with books, chiefly printed at It A few years ago there were only two native Christian booksellers in the city ; but now they are numerous. cept on special occasions, all the shops in the chief bazaars of Damascus are shut more "curely and deserted before sunset. The shopkeepers go to their several homes in the Jnng lanes and by-ways, and soon after sunset the great wooden gates of the bazaars and guarded by watchmen ; who, however, for a trifling fee will swing them back on ^ng hinges, at any hour of the night, for the accommodation of people who are We" known. requently ridden at midnight with my brother through the deserted bazaars. How I hav< 53