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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 408
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 408. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 408. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2618

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 408, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 408
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_429.jpg
Transcript 4o8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and a variety of hard stones set, ready to be engraved, as signet rings. Other drawers contain old coins and various small articles of jewellery. In a large cabinet curious ornaments of massive silver worn by the peasantry are kept. They are sold by weight. It is a collection of this kind which is shown outside the cabinet on page 393, and the scales are near at hand. This khan has only two narrow entrances, which are closed and guarded at night. One of these doors leads from the silk-reelers' bazaar, and the other from the long arcade occupied by the fancy carpenters. When I first passed through one of these narrow doorways and found myself within the khan, I could not help thinking that it looked like the patched-up ruin of some deserted sanctuary, which had been invaded and taken possession of by an army of tinkers. The smoke and the gas from the numerous charcoal fires, the noise of anvils and hammers, and the loudly raised echoing voices of buyers and sellers almost bewildered me. I had, perhaps unreasonably, expected to see an entirely different kind of place, and I could hardly believe that the kawass who was attending me had conducted me rightly. However, he led me through the crowded passages to the stall of a clever young Armenian silversmith, who was engaged on some work for my brother. As I had some directions to give to him, I was assisted to mount on to his platform, and was soon seated on a block of wood which was borrowed for my use, and thoughtfully placed as far from the little furnace as possible. From this point I had a good view of the novel scene around me, and the opportunity of seeing various kinds of work in progress, and of examining the best productions of the workers ; for although I had never visited the khan before, I found that I was well known there, and many of the men quitted their stalls to show me their chefs d'ceuvre. There appeared to be no jealousy or rivalry among them. They all seemed good-naturedly eager that I should see everything that was worth seeing. One man showed me a very beautiful gold bracelet which he had just completed for a customer. It was formed of seven filigree discs set with pearls, linked together with pearl rosettes. The more elaborate and costly articles are generally made to order, and I was told that only simple articles for which there is a general demand were kept in stock. Sometimes a goldsmith is hired, as of old, to work by the day at the house of his employer. He brings his charcoal, stove, and tongs, his blow-pipe, and a few simple tools, and readily converts worn-out trinkets into new ones, and mounts gold coins or transforms them into delicate filigree work. It will be remembered that it is from the roof of the silversmiths' bazaar that the remarkable Greek inscription on a disused doorway of the Great Mosque can be seen (see page 423). Another bazaar which interested me especially was that of the booksellers and bookbinders, commonly called the " Suk el Miskiyeh," because it leads to the Great Mosque. I had been assured that the Muslim booksellers were very fanatical, and would not show their books to non- Muslims. However, with my brother's consent, I went there one day attended only by one of