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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 402
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 402. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2613.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 402. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2613

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 402, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2613.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 402
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_424.jpg
Transcript 4o2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. gourds, calabashes, broken pots, or metal bowls in their hands. Behind the cauldron stood two men to ladle out the soup, directed by the Mannun. I expressed a wish to taste the soup, so the sheikh sent for a silver drinking-cup (in the form of a saucer), and I was served. I found it was composed of rice, vegetables, and meat, flavoured with herbs, and was very substantial. I was afterwards conducted by the sheikh to the innermost court, and we entered the beautiful mosque which stands on the south side of it. The sunlight was streaming through the stained- glass windows of the clerestory of the dome, and a large chandelier, with beautiful lamps, was suspended from the centre. The walls were covered with glazed tiles ; those of the mihrab, the niche on the south side, were especially beautiful, and the largest I had seen—much too large to be drawn in my sketch-book full size. I told the sheikh that I regretted this. He instantly went to his house on the opposite side of the court, and brought me some very large well-made Turkish paper, and I made a careful drawing of a tile which measured fifteen inches and a quarter by twelve inches and one-eighth, which well represents the style and character of the tiles throughout the building. I afterwards took coffee and sherbet with him in his room, and he gathered for me his choicest flowers. As I passed across the great court, on my way out, I heard a terrible sound of lamentation. The little fever-stricken boy had just then died. A group of women stood in the doorway, and others quickly gathered round them from the neighbouring rooms. Then they together suddenly uttered the death-cry, called wilwdl, a peculiarly mournful cadence, with shrieks and pauses at regular intervals. This cry has been transmitted from one generation of mourners to another, and is probably exceedingly ancient; it may even be the echo of the great cry which was heard throughout all the land of Egypt when all the first-born were smitten (Gen. xii. 30). Throughout the East, the instant after a death has taken place the women present proclaim it by loud lamentations; all the women who hear it flock to the house of mourning and join in the " death cry," which cannot possibly be mistaken for any other sound. Professional mourners, who are " skilful in lamentation," are employed by wealthy people to assist the volunteers (see Amos v. 16). I had often heard this cry before, but it seemed to me especially mournful then. The dead child was the only son of a widow, and she " refused to be comforted" (Jeremiah xxxi. 15). I walked homewards sorrowfully, with the mournful chorus, " Alas for him ! alas for him !" ringing in my ears. The private houses of Damascus are almost as remarkable for their external plainness as for their internal splendour. A stranger in traversing the city would never guess that it contained such luxurious residences, for they are nearly always situated in tortuous streets with high bare walls on each side; an occasional doorway, more or less decorated, is the only outward and visible sign of their existence. Sometimes the doorway is sufficiently wide and lofty to admit a laden camel or a mounted horseman, and this indicates that it opens at once into a courtyard with stabling; but it is always pierced with a smaller door for ordinary use. The entrance to a private house is, however, generally only large enough to admit one person at a time, and opens into a passage which, after one or more abrupt turnings, leads into the