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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 401
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 401. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2612.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 401. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2612

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 401, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2612.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 401
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_423.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 401 4 * with the exception of a few which were carried off by the workmen. One of these s is in my possession, it having been obtained at the time by the clerk of the works cloved to superintend the erection of the Anglican church at Jerusalem, which is just opposite to the citadel (see page 102). By him it was brought to England, and given to my father the late Mr. W. G. Rogers. Experts pronounce the form and finish of this arrow-shaft to be quite perfect, but as it is neither barbed nor feathered it is the more difficult to determine its age. But thousands of such arrows must have sped from the battlements and bartizans of the citadel; and we may well imagine that when "the Tower of David" (see page 5) "was builded as an armoury," its loftiest chambers were stacked with arrows ready for the use of the archers on the battlements and bartizans (see Solomon's Song iv. 4). But we must return to the Citadel of Damascus. The north side of it is the most picturesque, and this can best be seen from the terraced roofs of houses on the north bank of the Barada, or from the balconies of the cafes by the river's side (see page 400). On page 385 the south-west angle of the citadel can be seen beyond the dome of the Great Mosque, and its position can be traced in the distance on page 411. From the north-west corner of the citadel a road leads westward almost direct to the Tekiyeh, the hospice founded by the Turkish Sultan Selim I. in a.d. 1516 (see pages 381 and 403), for the accommodation of the poor, and especially for pilgrims on their way to or from Mekka. (It was in the reign of this Sultan, 1512—1520, that Armenia, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt were incorporated with the Turkish Empire.) The hospice is pleasantly situated close to the Merj, or meadow, and the Barada flows in front of it. When I visited it in May, 1867, by appointment, attended only by one of the consular kawasses, I was kindly welcomed by the Sheikh et Tekiyeh in the great cloistered court, which is surrounded by domed chambers. I hese were occupied by pilgrims from all parts of Asia. All the doors were wide open, and in one apartment I saw a poor woman fanning her little son, who was dying of fever ; in another room a party of Kurds were sleeping, covered with sheepskins. The ogee pediments over the doorways and grated windows of these apartments were fitted with exquisitely esigned tiles, made expressly for their places. The colours were rich dark blue, delicate green, and turquoise blue, all outlined in black. Presently the Mannun et Tekiyeh invited - to witness the daily distribution of soup. He led me to the north side of the court, and ) a large vaulted hall or kitchen, supported by four massive columns and piers blackened by Ke. In the middle there were two rudely constructed open fire-places of cemented stone, . y side, and on each one stood an enormous cauldron of simmering soup. There were no leys; the smoke and steam escaped through the apertures in the great dome above. A s ool was placed for me in the deep high recess of a grated window, whence I could watch vos of poor people coming in. The greater number of them were not dwellers in the |ye , but consisted of the poor of the neighbouring districts. Some were literally clothed others almost naked, while a few were wrapped in sheets or blankets, or clothed with I hey ranged themselves against the blackened walls, and stood expectant, with 52