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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 397
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 397. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2608.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 397. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2608

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 397, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2608.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 397
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_419.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 397 l many ways meet, not far from the extreme west end of the street called Straight, the section of which is the Suk el 'Attarin, where drugs and spices and scents are sold. The most striking object in view is a tall and exceedingly beautiful minaret, covered with 1 Vhlv-cdazed green and blue tiles, glistening in the sunlight; the stone balustrade of the o-allerv which encircles it is carved into delicate tracery. It belongs to the great mosque built bv Sinan Pasha, Governor of Damascus, a.d. 1581, sixty-seven years after Syria had become a Turkish province, and it is named after him, Jami'a es Sinaniyeh. The* bazaar and college above described also owe their origin to him, and bear his name. In the court of this mosque there are several ancient marble columns. This mosque stands in what is called the Street of the Green Mosque. The view on steel, " A Street in Damascus," represents a portion of it, including a well-stocked grocer's shop, a cafe with an open window looking towards the Anti-Lebanon, characteristic groups of people, and a fine plane-tree. After passing along this street we pursue our way northwards, and presently enter a broad road planted with plane- trees, where the large Monastery of the Dancing or Whirling Dervishes is situated. This pleasant promenade, called the Derwishiyeh, leads direct to the south-west corner of the citadel, which towers grandly above all the surrounding buildings (see page 400). The date of its original erection is exceedingly doubtful. It is sometimes called the Castle of Saladin. The Sultan Bibars (a.d. 1260—1277), whose mausoleum has been described, is said to have almost rebuilt it; and for Melek el 'Ashra'af (1291) the same honour has been claimed. The building is eight hundred and forty feet from north to south, and six hundred feet from east to west. It occupies the north-west angle of the ancient boundary of the city, and is surrounded by a deep moat nearly twenty feet wide, partly overgrown with reeds. All the published plans which I have seen of this fortress, in guide-books and elsewhere, represent it as a perfect quadrangle, but this is far from being correct. The length of the west wall is about one-third less than that of the east wall, and the south wall slightly slopes towards it; but the north wall, which is at right-angles with the east wall for about two-thirds of its length, bends abruptly to meet the western wall. My authority for this, in addition to my own observation, 1 a very large unpublished map of Damascus, with plans of its principal buildings, made by I local military authorities about fifteen years ago. It was lent to me by H.E. Dervish asha, the Military Governor-General, and at my request he kindly gave me permission to - a tracing of it. (I was at the time residing with my brother, Mr. E. T. Rogers, who ien H.B.M. Consul at Damascus, and to that circumstance I owe the many privileges I > •; Ihe foundations of the citadel are evidently very ancient, and date from a time long > Muslim rule. The lofty walls, which are built of rusticated stones with marginal are strengthened, and at the same time embellished, by twelve boldly projecting P aced at nearly equal distances from each other all round the building ; they are not, niiorm in size. Two of the towers are shown on page 400, and from these some idea 1 a el as a whole may be formed. (Compare this illustration with the representations e of Jerusalem on pages 5 and 105.) Projecting from the highest story of each