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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 395
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 395. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2606.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 395. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2606

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 395, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2606.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 395
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_417.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 395 11 1 tombs side by side on a slightly raised marble platform. The mihrab niche on the th side is formed of the choicest marbles, and above it there is an elaborate floral design, ted jn giass mosaics on gold glass mosaic ground. The first time I entered this beautiful mb-house it was in use as a school, and a crowd of boys of various ranks were chanting a chanter of the Koran. Some of them wore gold-embroidered jackets and crimson fezzes, others only a single garment of white or indigo-dyecl cotton, with some kind of girdle, and on their heads a white skull cap, with or without a coloured kerchief twisted round turban fashion. After their dismissal the schoolmaster not only kindly allowed me to make a sketch of the interior, but provided me with some paper that I might take rubbings of a beautiful stucco- work basso-relievo dado frieze. This building is one of the most complete specimens of thirteenth-century work in Damascus. Another example of purely Saracenic architecture, but of a later date, is given on page 392, the Jamia Sabuniyeh, which is built of alternate courses of white stone and black basalt, and decorated with inlaid conventional designs of the same materials. The portal is very lofty, rising even higher than the facade of the building, and its canopy is enriched with the stalactite ornament especially characteristic of all Arabian architecture, whether in Europe, Asia, or Africa. On the bar half-way up across the entrance lamps are suspended on the eve of certain festivals, and all through the night during the month of Ramadan. The octagon minaret has a well-sheltered gallery and eight elegant trefoil-headed niches, alternately pierced with narrow openings. Not far from this mosque, which is in the south-western district, stands the Sinaniyeh College, built in the same style. The Suk es Sinaniyeh, which we now enter, is one of the broadest and handsomest bazaars of Damascus. Through the principal part of it, at intervals of about thirty feet, there are stone arches, twenty-nine feet high, supporting a gabled wooden roof pierced with square openings through which the sunlight streams. This bazaar, which leads from the straggling peasant suburb called El Meidan, is pre-eminently the bazaar of the Bedawin and fellahin (Bedouins and peasantry). Here they may be seen bargaining for garments of the most primitive fashion, such as we may well imagine Abraham himself to have iorn' ancl household and tent furniture such as Sara, his wife, must have used—sheepskin I large, heavy, striped cloaks made of goat's hair, serving as outer garments by day and wrings by night (see Exodus xxii. 26, 27); caps and turban cloths; striped and fringed - Je is, or head shawls (well shown on page 400, worn by the man in the foreground); high oots and clumsy-looking pointed shoes; milking tubs; strong round trays and shallow 5 made of black and white and red. straw woven into excellent and varied geometrical simple cooking apparatus and metal dishes of many sizes, some of them very large— erY Bedawy likes to possess " a lordly dish " (Judges v. 25) as a sign of his hospitality. In par ot the bazaar there are tasselled saddle-bags, and camels' head-gear adorned with snells, the Cyprcea moneta (see page 424). Curious crescent-shaped ornaments of - ign, with heavy chains of silver or some inferior metal, for the necks of horses or