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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 391
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 391. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 391. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2602

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 391, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 391
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_413.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 391 •tremity, in the draper's bazaar, there still stands a portion of a splendid archway. The 1 er part of the remaining columns can be seen from the bazaar, but they are so lofty that it * necessary to mount on to the roof of a neighbouring house (which is courteously permitted on payment of a few piastres) in order to see the upper portion of them and three Corinthian aoitals which support a richly carved architrave and a portion of the arch, which must have been at least sixty feet in height. A large fragment of the gable which rose above it is also preserved ; it is pierced by a small window (see page 396). The width of the whole structure was about eighty feet, and its height, measuring to the top of the pediment, must have been about seventy feet. While looking at this relic of Roman work, it is interesting to remember that the celebrated architect, Apollodorus, who was employed by the Emperor Trajan to erect his mao-nificent column, and to build the great bridge across the Danube, was a native of Damascus. At the opposite or eastern side of the quadrangle, outside Bab Jeirun (the Gate of Jeirun), there is a fountain with a large jet; and a colonnade twice the length of that on the western side can be traced. It is recorded that a great Roman pediment which stood at the end of this colonnade was removed in a.d. 1215, by order of the Vizier of Melek el 'Aadel, and the stones of which it was composed were used to pave the court of the mosque. Portions of the great columns of this once-important gateway plainly indicate its position, and there was apparently a colonnade in front of it running north and south. But it is on the south side of the mosque that the most remarkable relics of former structures exist. To obtain a view of this portion of the building it is necessary to mount on to the roof of the silversmith's bazaar (see page 393), from which point can be seen, near the transept, a disused but magnificent doorway, with a small one on each side of it. They are richly decorated with sculptured scroll-work, somewhat similar in design and execution to that of the great gateway of the Temple of the Sun at Baalbek (see page 464). This was probably one of the triple portals of the Roman temple, subsequently used by the Christians as an entrance to their basilica, for on the upper beam of the central doorway there is an inscription in Ureek which evidently formed no part of the original design, and to introduce it a moulding has been cut away (see page 423). The sculptured words, well indicated in the illustration, B from the Septuagint version of Psalm cxlv. 13 : " Thy kingdom, O Christ, is an everlasting ingdom, and thy dominion endureth throughout all generations." The words O Christ being interpolated. nere is no record as to the time or occasion when the verse was inscribed here. Few US lms seem t0 be aware of its existence, and fewer still of its significance. n Asaker states that there was " an entrance to the temple on the south side by a triple y> and that in front of it was a large area surrounded by a double row of columns." This refers to the portal above described (see page 423), and the position of twenty of the Umns may be traced in the shoe bazaar (see pages 394 and 398I