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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 390
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 390. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 390. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2601

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 390, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 390
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_412.jpg
Transcript 39o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. same time endowed an institution for the support of two sets of mueddins to chant the call to prayer from his minaret to the end of time. The most beautiful of the three minarets is that at the south-west angle of the mosque, called Gharbiyeh. It occupies the place of one destroyed by fire in a.d. 1449. The Christians were accused of having set fire to it, and they were accordingly heavily taxed for its reconstruction. No expense was spared in the execution of the work. It is built of fine limestone and black basalt from the Hauran. The foundation, which rises to a considerable height, is square; by an ingenious mode of cutting the angles this is converted into an octagon, on each face of which there is a trefoil-headed niche surmounted by circular ornaments of inlaid black and white stone, four of which are pierced in the centre. Above these there is a covered projecting gallery supported by stalactite brackets and protected by a balustrade of beautiful tracery carved in stone. Here the mueddin stands to chant the call to prayer. Above this the minaret is more slender, and is ornamented with courses of black basalt and circles with bosses in the centre. Higher still there is another gallery with a carved balustrade, but without a canopy; here there is a framework on which to suspend lamps to be lighted at night during the month of Ramadan and on the eve of the great festivals of Islam. From the third and highest landing-place, which is surrounded by an ornamental battlement, rises a slender octagonal pinnacle surmounted by an egg-shaped finial, which supports a glittering crescent. This minaret may be distinguished in the view on page 411 to the left of the great dome, but a clearer representation of the upper portion of it is given on page 385. The third minaret is at the south-east angle of the mosque, and is called Madinet 'Isa, " the Minaret of Jesus," from the Muslim tradition that " when Christ comes to judge the world he will first descend on its summit." Perhaps this idea arose from the circumstance of this being the highest minaret in Syria. It is two hundred and fifty feet in height. It consists of a high square tower, on each side of which there are double-arched openings on two stages. The twin arches, which are of slightly pointed horseshoe form, are together framed in pointed arches of beautiful proportions, the masonry between the inner arches being pierced with a star-shaped or circular opening. In the illustration on page 385 a mueddin is admirably represented in the act of chanting the call to prayer from the higher of the two stages, only one of the twin arches, with its wooden balustrade, being shown. High above this level, from the summit of the square tower, springs an octagonal turret with two projecting open galleries one above the other, and still higher there is an inner gallery, which is surmounted by a tall pyramidal spire rising from an octagon base and crowned with a crescent. On page 411 this minaret may be distinguished in front of the great dome, which is more clearly shown on page 385, rising above the high dilapidated roof of the transept, and beyond the triple-gabled lead-covered roof of the aisles. The dome is called Kubbet en Nisr, " the Dome of the Vulture." The entrance to the court of the mosque, at Bab Berid, on the western side, is through the Muslim book bazaar, a lofty arcade in which there are remains of an ancient colonnade. This was without doubt one of the chief entrances to the ancient temple, for at its western