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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 387
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 387. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2598.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 387. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2598

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 387, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2598.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 387
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_409.jpg
Transcript DAMASCUS. 387 " Ibn Amwy" (the son of the little slave-girl). This mosque (to which strangers are Hmitted on payment of a fee) occupies the site of many former and important structures. A Roman temple which stood here was, towards the close of the fourth century, converted into a R zantine basilica dedicated to St. John the Baptist. It is said that his head was enclosed in 1 casket of °"old, and preserved in a cave or crypt beneath the building. On the capture of Damascus by the Saracens in 634, they took possession of the east end of the basilica, and Christians and Muslims for many years worshipped under one roof. It was not until the commencement of the eighth century that the whole building was seized by Welid I. (the fifth of the Omeiyad khalifs), and converted into a mosque. He did not, however, destroy the outer walls, but enriched them with costly mosaics of gold and precious stones and glass. He paved the floors with marbles of many colours, the ceiling was covered with carved wood inlaid with gold, and from it were suspended six hundred golden lamps. It is recorded that these lamps were a few years later removed by his successor, 'Amr Abd ul Aziz, and replaced by others of less intrinsic value, which included probably some at least of the beautiful glass lamps (now so rare and so highly prized), the manufacture of which in Damascus dates from this period. They were adorned with Arabic inscriptions in coloured enamels, including the name of the individual for whom they were made, and sometimes with an appropriate verse from the Koran, such as the following :— " God is the light of the heavens and of the earth. The similitude of His light is as a niche containing a lamp, the lamp in a glass, and the glass as though it were a shining star " (ch. xxiv. v. 35). In the year 1069 part of this mosque was destroyed by fire. In its present state it consists of a quadrangle four hundred and eighty feet long by three hundred and twenty-four feet wide, surrounded by a lofty wall of fine masonry. The northern part of the quadrangle is an open court paved with limestone, with slabs of marble of various colours introduced at intervals. There are cloisters round three sides of it, supported on arches resting on columns ot reddish-coloured stone, some of which are cylindrical, but the greater number are square and decorated with Byzantine and Arabesque ornament in low relief (see page 388). In the centre ot the court there is a fountain for religious ablutions, surmounted by a dome resting on ancient marble columns. At the east end there is an elegant little building called the " Dome of the lours." At the west end of the court stands the " Kubbet el Khazneh" (Dome of the reasures), which is faithfully represented on page 388. It is said that some valuable nuscnpts and ancient relics are preserved here, but they are inaccessible to strangers. It ?en suggested that this beautiful little structure may have been the baptistry of the church of St. John the Baptist. The sanctuary of the mosque occupies the southern 0 the great quandrangle, but is only separated from it by a row of columns now encased rY- It is four hundred and thirty feet long by one hundred and twenty-five feet wide, paved with tesselated marble, which is nearly everywhere covered with matting or carpets. Two rows of columns, twenty-three feet high, extend from east to west, S t e space into three aisles of equal width. A triple-gabled roof rests on horseshoe-