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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 386
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 386. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2597.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 386. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2597

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 386, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2597.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 386
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_408.jpg
Transcript 386 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. see one near the Shoemakers' Bazaar, on page 398, and another more important one opposite the citadel, on page 400. Outside the north-eastern (the Christian) quarter of Damascus, on the north-east road, called " the Zenobian way," which leads to Palmyra, and is approached from Bab Tuma (see page 416), there are many very attractive cafes, frequented chiefly by Christians, where the favourite beverage is raki, or raisin brandy. Here, too, there are some large gardens, where native family parties frequently spend the day from sunrise to sunset. But the pleasantest place for a picnic, according to my experience, is by the swiftly flowing stream which traverses the myrtle plantations of the Salihiyeh, the north-western suburb of Damascus, when the ever- fragrant trees, which rise to the height of sixty or seventy feet, are covered with blossom, or in December, when the fruit (which is a valuable astringent) is quite ripe. The trees are heavily taxed, but a large revenue is derived from the sale of myrtle branches, with which mourners in Muslim cemeteries decorate the tombs of their friends. It is very usual for all the women and children of a Muslim family to go regularly once a week to the burial-ground, generally on Thursday or Friday, to commune with the dead and place fresh flowers or myrtle branches on the family grave. There is an extensive and picturesque Muslim cemetery outside the eastern walls of the city, and another still larger one on the south-west side, which is called " Makbaret Bab es Saghir " (the Burial-ground of the Little Gate). A portion of this is shown on page 404. The gate from which the cemetery derives its name leads from the densely populated quarter called the Shagur, which is chiefly inhabited by peasants, and very rarely traversed by strangers. The gate is sometimes called Bab esh Shagur. The Christian cemeteries are on the south-east side of the city, and beyond them there are some very ancient Jewish graves. In Damascus there are seventy large or, as they may be called, cathedral mosques (Jamia), in which sermons are preached and congregational prayers are offered up for the reigning Sultan every Friday. Besides these there are about one hundred and eighty Muslim oratories or chapels (Mesjtd), to many of which schools are attached. Prayers are also frequently said at the grated windows of the little shrines or tomb-houses of celebrated welys, or saints, which are numerous in Damascus. Men of the higher classes rarely go to the mosques except on Fridays, as they can command proper places for ceremonial ablution and prayer in their own houses; but to a Muslim of the lower ranks, a large mosque which is open every day from sunrise to sunset or later, is like a second home. In its courts or cloisters he may not only rest and sleep, or read (see pages 388 and 403), but he may take his food and eat it there, and even pursue any cleanly and simple avocation. Notwithstanding this liberty the greatest decorum is observed. The largest and most ancient mosque in Damascus is the Jamia el Amwy, " The Great Mosque of the Omeiyades," which ranks only next in importance to the sanctuaries of Mekka, Medina, and Jerusalem. " Amwy" literally translated means " the little slave-girl." Tab'ary, the Arab historian, states that the Kinyah, or surname, of the founder of the Omeiyades dynasty