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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 384
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 384. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2595.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 384. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2595

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 384, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2595.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 384
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_406.jpg
Transcript 384 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. called El Ghutah. How old this name is cannot be determined, but we find it in the Jerusalem Talmud. This beautiful district shows what a Syrian desert may become under proper cultivation. No cultivation would, however, be attempted unless an ample supply of water could be provided for irrigation. That which is brought down by the different mountain streams is carried in many directions by a multitude of aqueducts, and distributed far and near. Not all the water, however, that is needed is supplied in this way. From the earliest times the inhabitants have had a method of obtaining it, on an inclined plain, by means of wells. But, in the case of any given well, the water from it does not supply the plain immediately about its own mouth. A well is sunk until abundant water is found. From the bottom of this well a shaft,, nearly horizontal, is driven underground until the surface is reached. Thus a well consists of a perpendicular and a long horizontal shaft, the latter bringing the water to the top of the ground at a great distance, perhaps, from the mouth of the well, and without the constant expense of men and machinery to raise it. In a full description of these wells other particulars should be mentioned, yet what we have said will give one a good idea of these singular underground aqueducts, of which there is a complete network beneath the Damascus plain. These, together with those on the surface, although many of both kinds are now in a ruined condition, combine to make this region, to the Orientals of the present day, a garden of beauty, just as they led the Hebrews to esteem it a " paradise among the rivers" (Babylonian Talmud, Erubin, 19 a). The inside of Damascus contrasts at first unfavourably with the outside. The streets, with few exceptions, are narrow, crooked, and filthy, and form a labyrinth, which makes a guide indispensable (see page 399). The houses are high and generally unsightly externally. There is but one hotel suitable for strangers; ifwas formerly kept by a Greek named Dimetri, and now by his widow; it is close by the station of the French diligence. It was built by a wealthy Damascene as a private residence, and contains an interior court, with a large fountain. * For native wayfarers there are, however, many places for rest and refreshment. Roadside cafes are numerous in the city and its suburbs, and especially on the road which approaches Damascus on the west through the Merj (see page 381). A good example of a suburban roadside cafe is given on page 383. A rude shed erected under some spreading trees, a number of low rush-seated stools, two or three tables for players at cards or dameh (the Arabic form of chess), and a good supply of coffee and pipes, are all that is needed. In the evening, lamps, coloured or plain, are suspended from the trees, and a wandering minstrel or professional storyteller entertains the smokers. Itinerant vendors of fruit, bread, cakes, and sweetmeats are generally found near a roadside cafe. A still more favourite position for a cafe is on a jutting balcony or kiosk, above a swiftly flowing stream or river. There are many such places in Damascus, and they look very bright and cheerful at night, with irregularly suspended lamps and lanterns reflected in the running water, which forms a murmuring accompaniment to the Arabic melodies, which are always in the minor key. For examples of these water-side cafes, * The following pages (to page 410), describing the cafes and principal buildings and bazaars of Damascus, are contributed by Miss M. E. Rogers.