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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 382
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 382. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 382. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2592

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 382, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 382
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_403.jpg
Transcript 382 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. (from 4 a.m. to 5.30 p.m.), over the splendid macadamised road of seventy miles, which was built by a French company after the massacre of i860. The climate is delightful; in the summer the heat rises to ioo° and 1040, but the nights are cool and the clews heavy. The Orientals call Damascus a terrestrial reflection of Paradise, " The Pearl of the East," and " The Eye of the Desert." The Damascenes believe that the Garden of Eden was located there, and that the clay of which Adam was formed was taken from the banks of the Abana. Fifteen miles north of the city, on a lofty cliff,, the reputed tomb of Abel is shown, which measures thirty feet in length ! It is reported that when Mohammed, on one of his journeys as a camel-driver from Mecca, in the service of Khadijah, who afterwards became his wife, reached the brow of the barren hill of Kasyun, and saw the city and gardens below in all their enchanting beauty, he turned away, saying, " Man can have but one paradise ; my paradise is fixed above." But his guide remained and exclaimed, " Here let me die!" The spot is marked by a small building called " Kubbet en Nusr," which is said to contain the grave of the guide. The English historian, Henry Thomas Buckle, who died in Damascus, May 29, 1862, said, when he beheld the city from the same place only a fortnight before his death: " This is, indeed, worth all the toil and danger it has cost me to come here ! " Dean Stanley declares, " There may be other views in the world more beautiful ; there can hardly be another at once so beautiful and so instructive." Dr. J. L. Porter, who spent several years in Damascus, says : " Damascus occupies one of those sites which Nature seems to have intended for a perennial city ; its beauty stands unrivalled, its richness has passed into a proverb, and its supply of water is unlimited, making fountains sparkle in every dwelling." The beauty of Damascus is all the more striking for the contrast to the barren desert which surrounds this oasis. The white city looks like a diamond set in the dark green of fruitful gardens. These gardens and orchards extend several miles around the city to the borders of the desert, and are a marvel of fertility. The fields of wheat and barley and beans are shaded by fruit and forest trees—the poplar, the cypress, the palm, the walnut, the citron, the pomegranate, the orange, the apricot, the fig-tree, arrayed in a rich variety of colours, laden with golden fruit, and filling the air with sweet fragrance. The soil is refreshed by perennial streams of abounding water from the mountain. A ride through these shady groves, after a journey over the barren desert under the scorching heat of the Syrian sun, is a luxury which must be enjoyed to be appreciated. The finest views of Damascus and its environs may be obtained from a minaret of the Great Mosque (see pages 385 and 411), and from various points of the range of hills northwest of the city, the rugged Jebel Kasyun. The beauty and fertility of the surroundings of Damascus are chiefly due to the abundance of water, this greatest of blessings in a sandy and rocky desert, and fit symbol of life and regeneration. Naaman of old very naturally thought the rivers of Damascus, Abana (or Amana) and Pharpar, far better than all the waters of Israel (2 Kings v. 12). They are now called the Barada (the Chrysorrhoas, or Gold River of the Greeks), and El 'Awaj (see