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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 374
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 374. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 374. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2584

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 374, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 374
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_395.jpg
Transcript 374 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. it is likewise the main route to Damascus, of those on the north of Jebel esh Sheikh. None of the roads in these mountains are easy, and, however strong and patient men and beasts of burden may be, they soon become weary when struggling along over these difficult paths. A few years since a strange innovation was made upon the primitive methods of intercourse in these mountains by a French company that built a substantial road from Beirut to Damascus (see page 380). It was laid out and constructed by the best engineering skill that could be employed; it is seventy miles long, is macadamised throughout its entire extent, and is so broad and smooth that riding and driving upon it is a real luxury. It commands views of portions of the grandest Lebanon scenery, but at certain points is so high that sometimes for days together it is blocked by snow. The old winding and rocky path follows the same general direction as the new road, and is still used by the Syrians and Arabs, who are not able or disposed to pay the tax which the company require for the use of theirs. The contrast between the donkey or the camel toiling slowly over this rough mountain-trail, and the diligence drawn by strong, fleet horses, moving easily over the splendid carriage-way, will lead one to appreciate the blessings of civilisation so far as conveniences for travelling are concerned. Doubtless, if we extended our survey over the entire history of the Lebanon, we should find that paved roads and wheeled vehicles are, after all, no novelty here, for traces of more than one Roman road exist; and it is not at all likely that Damascus, which from time immemorial has been one of the foremost cities in the East, would have been content with a rocky bridle-path as its only means of communication with the near seaports where the ships of the world lay at anchor. There was, in the Roman times at least, a road between the two mountain ranges coming from the north past Ba'albek, and leading over Lebanon to the coast; and another running north-west from Damascus past Abila, the capital of the district called Abilene, which is mentioned in the third chapter of the Gospel of Luke. Rasheiya is pleasantly situated on a steep but terraced slope which abounds in vineyards and orchards (see page 375). Among its three thousand inhabitants there are a few Protestants. The finest object in the town is the old palace, which, like that at Hasbeiya, was also a castle, and which in the same manner was the scene of a massacre in i860, when eight hundred innocent Christians that had taken refuge within it were foully murdered (see page 376). The view from Rasheiya is extended, and interesting from the fact that one looks out upon uplands and mountain ranges. The eastern face of Lebanon is in sight, and in the south the white head of Hermon (Jebel esh Sheikh) appears in its regal glory (see page 375). Its height is not so imposing as when seen from the Lake of Tiberias (see page 297) ; yet, from whatever point it is beheld, it impresses the mind with a sense of sublimity, strength, and massive grandeur. The ascent of Hermon is by no means a difficult task. Its summit can be reached in six hours from Rasheiya. No specially rocky or broken paths have to be surmounted, and the route is in every respect much easier than many of those in the Lebanon that are in constant use. One may have been suffering from the heat on the sea-coast or the plains of Damascus, but here one can, even in midsummer, revel in snow-fields and drink water