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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 369
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 369. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 369. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2579

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 369, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 369
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_390.jpg
Transcript SOURCE OF THE JORDAN. 369 Another important fact connected with Hasbeiya is, that near it there are a large number f bitumen pits or wells, some of which are fifty feet deep, and one which Dr. Thomson easured extended to the depth of one hundred and sixteen feet. These are worked only in a ooor way, but the mineral is hard and of the finest quality, and when cleaved it presents a beautiful cdossy surface, which it retains for a long time. The people affirm that the bitumen is constantly forming, and hence that an exhausted well, after being cleared for some time, will be found filled and ready for mining again. Dr. Robinson learned that " the bitumen was sold chiefly in Damascus, and mainly used on vines to keep off insects which destroy the grapes." What is collected at present, however, is sent to Europe. A good deal of it exists about the Dead Sea, and is said to appear upon the surface, especially after an earthquake. Doubtless the deposits of this mineral are much more extensive and numerous than is at present known, and they may hereafter prove a source of considerable wealth. The mineral deposits of Syria have never yet been thoroughly examined, nor have those that are known ever been worked in any adequate manner. Besides bitumen, the sulphur-beds are rich and valuable. Rock-salt, also, could be mined with great profit south of the Dead Sea, but the inhabitants are not allowed to touch it. Lead and copper also exist; but the most extensive deposits that are at present known are iron. Valuable beds have been discovered at different points in the Lebanon, and some of them have been worked in times past with considerable success. We have examined one such bed lying west and south-west of the great cedars, which extends in a north and south line for several miles and crosses Wady Kadisha. This wady is a gigantic chasm that has been cut into the side of the mountain to a depth of fifteen hundred feet. The walls are perpendicular, and the deposit of iron ore of which we speak can be distinctly traced on either side, and appears to be about five hundred feet in thickness. Ore from this deposit we have had examined, and it yields but eleven per cent, of impurities, consisting almost wholly of silica. This bed is not more than fifteen miles from the sea-coast. There are also extensive deposits of coal; but that found on or near the surface is said to contain a good deal of sulphur. Beneath the surface, wherever examinations have been made by experts, coal of excellent quality is developed ; and it is the opinion of these persons that at a proper depth there is probably an unlimited supply. Coal and iron in untold amounts, lying side by side in close proximity to the seaboard, and no one allowed to make them productive! The Government either will not or cannot work them, and it certainly puts all sorts of obstacles in the way of foreign capitalists who stand ready to develop these mines. As the most remote and highest source of the Jordan is but half an hour north of asbeiya, one will visit with pleasure the locality where that river of the Holy Land, with ucn are connected so many sacred associations, actually has its rise. The fountain, like that sesarea Philippi, bursts forth from the foot of a bluff which in this case is of volcanic origin, ^ends into the valley a large volume of water. A dam has been thrown across the 1 ' making a pretty waterfall, which, together with the pond and mill-race, the modern 1 ge and the old scraggy trees, form quite a romantic spot. 48