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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 368
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 368. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 368. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2578

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 368, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 368
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_389.jpg
Transcript 368 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. have within recent years been explored by W. J. Maxwell, C.E., and Rev. Daniel Bliss, D.D. President of the Syrian Protestant College in Beirut, to a distance of nearly a mile; and the wonders there found to exist are no doubt but a repetition of those in yet unexplored caves in other parts of the Lebanon mountains. From the temple at Hebbariyeh to Hasbeiya the distance is about one hour and a half, which would make, altogether, six hours between Hasbeiya and Banias, while the distance in a straight line between these two points is not more than twelve miles. Hasbeiya is interesting, in the first place, on account of its situation (see page 370). The valley just here is in the form of an amphitheatre, and on three of its sides the town is surrounded by hills, which are covered with vineyards and olive-groves to their very summits. The village is situated on both sides of the ravine ; and on a ridge, which projects at one point almost to the bed of the torrent, stands the famous palace or castle which, no longer ago than i860, was the scene of dark and bloody deeds (see page 371). Four-fifths of the inhabitants of Hasbeiya are Christians, and the Protestant community is large and important. The American missionaries have for many years laboured here, until this has become one of their strongest outposts. Besides the profit of their fruit-trees, the people depend largely for income upon the fine grapes which these hillsides produce, and which are converted into raisins, or into syrup called dibs; for both of these articles find a ready sale. The village itself has not many attractions ; yet the mission church and school, the mosque with its minaret, the pointed arches, the crumbling walls richly overgrown with beautiful creeping plants and vines, the tall cypress- trees about the palace, and men and women everywhere engaged in the struggle for existence, together with the natural features already pointed out, will no doubt interest the traveller who can devote time to this place, which is considered one of the most flourishing towns of the Lebanon. One cannot, however, visit the palace without a shudder at the thought of the horrible cruelties which were perpetrated upon innocent and defenceless people but a score of years since. Those massacres, which startled Europe and sent a French army to the Lebanon and a British fleet to St. George's Bay, nominally carried on by the Druses but secretly instigated by the Turks, are but a single item in the catalogue of deeds of violence and shame for which the government that has so long oppressed Syria is responsible. On the occasion now referred to, during "that sad battle-summer of i860," the Christians of Hasbeiya fled to the castle and implored the protection of the garrison. The Turkish officers in charge gave them " a written guarantee, pledging the faith of the Sultan for their personal safety, on condition that they delivered up their arms." This they did, and were confined in the castle, where they remained seven days, suffering meantime very much from hunger and thirst. At the close of this period of terrible suspense the officers of the garrison opened the doors to the murderers, and the slaughter of one thousand victims was attended with horrors too revolting to be either written or told. The Turkish colonel in command here at the time was subsequently, under British influence, tried for this offence and shot in the streets of Damascus.