Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 365
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 365. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 365. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2575

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 365, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 365
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_386.jpg
Transcript WADY SHIB'A. 365 are within the means of the poorest person. Four small water-coolers can be bought for a penny (see page 363). In the East this business must have been one of the most essential branches of industry from the remotest times. The ground about some of the ruined cities in Bashan is literally covered with broken pottery. On some of the artificial mounds in the Jordan Valley we have seen it so thick that it could easily be raked into heaps. However deep about any city excavations are carried, the debris is found to be composed largely of the same material. In practical use the waste of the article must be immense ; and this has been true in all the past. One finds in the pottery various light shades of colour, although perhaps red is the most common; while in the New Testament times the black, which is still found in some markets, was considered the most valuable. It appears from the Talmud that Kefr Chananyah, a town in Galilee, had a monopoly of its manufacture. About one hour north-east of Rasheiyet el Fukhar (see page 363), over a road characteristic of these mountains, we reach Hebbariyeh (see page 367), a village interesting on account of its position among these wild and barren hills, and also because it contains the ruins of an ancient temple (see page 366). This was fifty-eight feet long by thirty-one feet wide. The walls were thirty-two feet high and six feet thick. Many of the stones were large, and one at least that Dr. Robinson measured was fifteen feet in length by two feet nine inches in width, and the same in thickness. The capitals are Ionic, and the temple faced the east, looking up the great gorge which opens before it " as if to catch the first beams of the morning sun rising over Hermon." Wady Shib'a, the gorge just referred to, is one of the grandest about Jebel esh Sheikh. The village of the same name is said to be the highest in these mountains, and the property of the villagers has in days past consisted largely of goats (see page 367). They climb up and feed where men cannot go, and thrive where other domestic animals would perish. It is easy see how, during the summer months, these people are very comfortable even in the rude novels which serve as their abodes ; but in winter, when the valleys are filled with snow and ce, and the hills above them are covered with the same, it is a problem how they keep from isning, to say nothing of the luxury of communicating with neighbouring villages and towns. he citizens of New York or London who pine for mountain air would find in Wady Shib'a 0 the most charming and healthful places in the world. We ourselves have enjoyed in va ley our sweetest sleep. Great fountains of ice-cold water, clear and sparkling, burst from -ground and rush down the way of the torrents, filling the mighty chasms with the noise of e and angry streams. Here everything is invigorating and inspiring; sunrise and ■ among these royal peaks, the air doubly freighted with life, Nature in its wildest aspects, inspire to reanimate the body and make the mind buoyant and hopeful. ountains bursting on all sides from the foot of Hermon and Lebanon, and supplying earns to fertilise the valleys, are a peculiar feature of these memorable hills ; while in they are bleak and barren themselves, yet they supply that which for miles in