Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 364
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 364. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 364. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2574

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 364, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 364
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_385.jpg
Transcript 364 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. between the two points has long since been proved to be impossible. This lake is interesting- further from the fact that it occupies the mouth of an extinct crater, and its surface is not far from two hundred feet below the surrounding table-land. Our own measurements make its circumference about one mile and a half in extent. In going north from this point, where we have had a glimpse of some of the noble oaks of Bashan, we shall pass over ground seldom frequented by the ordinary traveller in Palestine for the reason that the routes are too difficult and the attractions too few, and possibly also in part because the traveller is in too much of a hurry. But it would be a mistake to suppose that these grand hills have no points of natural as well as historic interest. Four or five miles north of Banias one may visit Kul'at Bustra, a group of ruins with fortifications situated on a projecting shoulder of Mount Hermon, not less than one thousand feet above the plain. Above the ruins there is a small plateau, and the view from this point is wide and beautiful. The ruins are thought to be those of a temple, or of several temples ; for the foundations of four or five large buildings appear, constructed of great stones, while columns, cisterns, and reservoirs are abundant. The place is supposed to be of high antiquity, and it certainly was one peculiarly favoured for defence. Neither inscription nor style of architecture, however, gives us any clue to its origin. The valley which lies below us to the west, and which we ascend, is called Wady et Teim, and is the natural continuation of the valley of the Jordan. Beyond the gorge of the Hasbany, which at times is a formidable river, lies the rolling upland of Merj 'Ayun, where the rich soil and the fine scattered trees remind one of some of the beautiful park scenery of England. The road from Banias past Kul'at esh Shukif to Sidon leads across this attractive plain. This valley is full of villages, although on our route we pass but few of them. Going still north, the country is broken and the roads are rocky, but here and there groves of oaks or olive-trees dot the small valleys or the steep hillsides, and wherever we approach a stream the scenery is romantic and wild. Above us, too, rise the bold cliffs and barren sides of Hermon. Something more than half an hour to the right from the bed of Wady Khureibeh is a village of considerable size called Rasheiyet el Fukhar. The potteries of this place are celebrated throughout Syria. The pottery is carried south into Palestine, east into the Hauran and the markets of Damascus, north to Hums (Emessa) and Hamah (Hamath), and west to the cities of the sea-coast. All kinds of household vessels are made here, and some of the articles are highly ornamented. Considering how remote in the mountains this village is, ana the unusually rugged and difficult paths which connect it with any possible market, and also the fact that all this fragile stuff has to be transported on the backs of mules and donkeys, it is a wonder that any of it ever reaches its destination in a perfect state. A foreigner visiting t e different cities of Syria is surprised at the amount of ware of this kind that is exposed for sale, and also at the remarkable variety in the size and shape of the various articles. The tra of the potter in Palestine is always good, because what he produces is always in demanc Were these articles costly, the case might be different; but, on the contrary, the necesj