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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 361
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 361. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2571.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 361. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2571

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 361, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2571.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 361
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_382.jpg
Transcript RUINS IN BASHAN. 361 q no- vii. 4, " the tower of Lebanon which looketh towards Damascus," could refer to none other than this sacred mountain. Kin^ Oo", who " reigned in Mount Hermon (see page 375), and in Salcah and in all Bashan" (Josh. xii. 5), could from this natural watch-tower overlook every part of his wide dominions. Those ancient cities of the giants, " fenced with high walls, gates, and bars" (Deut. iii. 5), would appear like dark masses on the distant plain. At a later time Bashan became a land of temples, and its ruins are justly regarded as among the finest in the East, if not in the world. Were they as accessible as those of Greece and Rome, the tide of admirers of all that is splendid in ancient architecture would be turned from Athens and the Tiber to the monuments that exist on the east of the Jordan. We ourselves have visited and measured eleven of its thirteen great theatres. We have also examined scores of its ruined churches, for in the early centuries of our era Christianity had a strong hold upon all this vast and fertile region. There is abundant evidence that this part of Palestine has been densely populated, and that the inhabitants were not only possessed of wealth and intelligence, but enjoyed also an unusual degree of prosperity. At present, however, wandering tribes roam here at will, and the cities are in desolation. In Bible times the " oaks of Bashan" seem to have enjoyed a special fame. The Phoenicians of Tyre used them in building their ships (Ezekiel xxvii. 6). These trees have for the most part disappeared, for, between the Arab and the Turk, their struggle for existence has been in vain. Yet among the Gilead hills fine forests are still to be found. Travellers visit western Palestine, which is denuded of trees, and report that none exist in the country. In the section east of the Jordan just referred to there are even groves of timber—a strange sight in that land, where forests have for the most part been swept away. Occasionally a group of very ancient oaks is met with, in which the single trees, not being confined by others, have sent out wide-spreading branches. One of the most picturesque and beautiful oak-groves in Syria exists not far east from the castle of Subeibeh or Banias. Under its delightful shade the traveller may pitch his tent and enjoy the upland breeze, or the view of the hillside which slopes gradually westward towards the Huleh Plain. Beneath these oaks there are a number of Moslem graves, the most revered of which is that of Sheikh Othman el Hazury. The trees above them are sacred, and hence are allowed to stand (see page 359). Ancient graves beneath ancient and sacred trees are a common sight throughout Palestine. s not always, however, that a saint whose grave is honoured has the luxury of a stately tree e his resting-place. There is often but a rude pile of stones; yet in the settled portions of -ountry the grave is usually marked by a tomb that has been built with some care. These vary in size; they have a dome which is whitewashed and a door by which the large room is entered. In the grove just described the graves are marked by a platform of with an oval coping made of stone and mortar. Of the more elaborate kind to which we > e wely of El Khidr or St. George, just above the grotto at Banias (see page 348), is ample. But, whether marked by rude stones, a well-built tomb, or a sacred tree, the 47