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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 360
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 360. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2569.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 360. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2569

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 360, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2569.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 360
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_380.jpg
Transcript 36o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. dawn " (Job iii. 9) opening upon " fair Damascus " is a sight of beauty which belongs to the Lebanon and Hermon alone. The fertile plain of Bashan fading into the great desert on the east, the almost boundless expanse of the Mediterranean on the west, and about one's feet a wilderness of broken and distorted hills, formed a picture upon which no doubt more than one sacred poet had gazed with the deepest interest. Even the Romans looked with admiration upon these mountains, their landmarks as in ships they approached the coast from the west; and one of their most gifted writers, Tacitus, after having spoken of the people of Judaea as " strong and patient of labour," of its soil as 11 rich and fertile," and of its palm-trees as " beautiful and lofty," refers to them as follows: 11 Libanus .... rises to a great height, affording shade under its verdant groves, and even in the ardent heat of that sultry region is covered at the top with eternal snow. From this mountain the river Jordan derives its source and the abundance of its waters " (Hist, bk. v. 6). The Syrian coast presents the physical peculiarity of two important ranges of mountains running nearly parallel to each other throughout the greater part of its whole extent. It is on the northern border of the Holy Land that these two ranges reach their greatest height. The highest point is one of the peaks near Tripoli, which ascends to ten thousand feet, while Jebel Sunnin, which overlooks Beirut, is a little less than eight thousand six hundred feet. In the opposite range, Jebel esh Sheikh, or Mount Hermon, the highest summit, is nearly ten thousand feet above the sea (see page 375). Between the Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon there is a great valley, called by classical writers Ccele or Hollow Syria. By the Arabs it is called Btikaa, which is a survival of the ancient Hebrew name BikatJi, or valley. Here we find two of the great rivers of Syria, the Orontes running north and the Leontes—el Litany (see page 372) —running south, both having their rise at no great distance from each other in the neighbourhood of Ba'albek. Still farther south this general depression becomes what is called the Ghor or Valley of the Jordan, which includes Lake Merom, the Sea of Galilee, the river Jordan (see page 163), and the Dead Sea (see page 152). The extension southward is called the 'Arabah, while about one hundred miles of the extreme southern portion is occupied by what is called the Gulf of 'Akaba, the eastern arm of the Red Sea. The Jordan Valley, for at least one hundred and twenty-five miles of its course, presents- the strange phenomenon of being sunk below the level of the Mediterranean, and this depression at one point is not less than thirteen hundred feet. Far in the north rises the noble and majestic Hermon, one of the grandest objects on the globe (see page 297). It is not one of a group, a peak higher and more imposing than other peaks which surround it; but it stands apart, unaffected by contrast with mountains of equa even of less grandeur. A remarkable fact about Hermon is that its white dome, its " eterna tent of snow," is visible from nearly every section of both eastern and western Palestine, only from Galilee, but from many points in Samaria (see page 233) and Judaea as wre , Olivet and the Dead Sea, from Gilead and Bashan, it is clearly seen, and is looked up t0 the great landmark of the country. Some scholars have thought that the words in So on