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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 357
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 357. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2566.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 357. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2566

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 357, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2566.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 357
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_377.jpg
Transcript SUBEIBEH. 357 il against it." This city, famous for the visits and works of kings, emperors, and •' rious crenerals, was honoured also by the presence of Christ. This is, however, but one f the many strange contrasts which meet us at almost every turn as we study the history of this land. A little more than one hour from Banias is the great castle of Subeibeh (see page 354). This has been one of the strongest fortresses in the East. It exhibits the work of every period from the early Phoenician to the time of the Crusaders. Its situation is remarkable, and from its broken walls one looks across the Huleh Plain to the hills of Galilee in the west, while at his feet the mountain-slope descends in terraces that are covered with oaks and olive- trees. The castle is not far from one thousand feet long by about three hundred feet in width, and the walls at some points are even yet one hundred feet high. The natural approach to it is from the east, while it is well-nigh inaccessible from the south, west, and north. On the north side the mountain, for six hundred feet below the castle, presents an almost perpendicular wall before the bottom of the ravine is reached. The strength of the position has been greatly augmented by the skill and labour of man, until this might appropriately be called the Gibraltar of Palestine. Situated at the southern base of Mount Hermon, the armies from the East would pass by it on their way to the sea-coast and Egypt; and the same might be true on their return, as we know was the case with one of the earliest Eastern invaders, Chedorlaomer, whose date is at least twenty centuries before the birth of Christ. The cuneiform inscriptions often speak of Assyrian kings reaching the kingdom of Damascus, and then entering the kingdom of Tyre. They would be almost compelled to follow the great highway of the nations on which this fortress stands. The Phoenicians, no doubt, used all the means in their power to repel these invaders, and these two facts are sufficient to account for the existence of this castle at this point, while the urgency of the case demanded that it should be built with all possible strength. From this point two roads diverge, one leading to Tyre and the other to Sidon. e have found on the road leading hence to Tyre, Assyrian sculptures which prove the early passing over this route of their great armies. At the eastern end of this castle stands the itadel of the place (see page 355). It has a wall and a moat of its own. It is one hundred nd fifty feet higher than the castle proper, which lies below it to the west. Here one has client illustration of a fact often mentioned by Josephus and other ancient writers, that the castle was taken in any given case, the garrison could retire to the citadel and resist iemy for a long time, if not with entire success. Such a citadel might best be described - within a castle, with the difference that the inner one would possess greater strength a"d greater means of resistance. >eh played an important part in the history of the Crusades, and was often taken and uring those bloody wars between Moslem and Christian. Underneath the ruins, rawled by a difficult passage, we found a stone ball such as were in common use in ancient sieves TV»* * t> - 1 nis is a small one, weighing not more than fourteen pounds, while some that y the ballista, as described by Josephus, weighed at least one hundred pounds,