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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 356
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 356. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 356. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2565

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 356, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 356
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_376.jpg
Transcript 00 6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. was ten times as high in price at Caesarea Philippi as it was at Gischala, John had a lame quantity which was stored at the latter place taken to the former, where he realised on it vast sum. The transaction shows the shrewdness of the man, and also his unprincipled character; for he pretended to do it that the Jews of Caesarea Philippi (see page 348) mio-ht not be obliged to use that which was prepared by foreigners, which necessity did not exist and also that he had authority from the governor of Galilee, which was directly contrary to fact (Josephus, " Life," xiii. 3). In a.d. 67, after the destruction of Jotapata, and Galilee was practically subdued, King Agrippa II. invited Vespasian to Caesarea Philippi, and entertained him "in the best manner his resources permitted." Here the Roman general " rested his troops for twenty days, and enjoyed himself in festivities, presenting thank-offerings to God for his success " (" Wars," iii. 9, 7). This was in midsummer, and his son Titus was with him during this interval of relaxation from their work of conquest. Three years later, in a.d. 70, after Vespasian had gone to Rome, Titus, who had taken Jerusalem, went to Caesarea Philippi, and remained some time exhibiting various shows. Very many of the Jewish prisoners were brought hither at this time, and destroyed in the most violent and cruel manner. " Some were thrown to wild beasts, while others in large bodies were compelled to encounter one another in combat" (" Wars," vii. 2, 1). These scenes and deeds of blood, which the Romans enjoyed and looked upon as sport, only add to the chequered history of this ancient place, which has witnessed almost every variety of fortune that cities or men can experience. During the reign of Diocletian there existed here a large community of Jews, and they are said to have been severely treated by the emperor. In the fourth century it was the seat of a bishop, who was subject to the Archbishop of Antioch. The extant coins of Panias cover a period of nearly two hundred and fifty years. Coins of Herod Philip exist with the head of the Roman emperor upon them, although this is said to have been in violation of the Mosaic law. On the reverse of these coins a temple is figured, which may have been intended to represent the one at Pamum already referred to, built by Herod the Great of white marble, in B.C. 20, and dedicated to Augustus (" Wars," i. 21, 3). Caesarea Philippi has special claims upon our attention from the fact that it was visited by our Lord. It was here that Christ questioned his disciples as to his own character: " Whom do men say that I the Son of man am?" (Matt, xvi.) The majority of those who have studied most carefully the gospel history agree in placing near here the scene 0 Transfiguration. This single fact would make it one of the most sacred places in the 0 > Land. It had natural beauty and wealth; it had costly public buildings, temples, and mar gods. Emotions of a peculiar character are wakened in the mind when we consider tie that Jesus of Nazareth looked upon all these things. On the one hand were the military powe of Rome and pagan idolatry in its most fascinating forms, and on the other Christ an disciples, a humble band ; but the Master utters to one of them the notable words : art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell sha