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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 353
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 353. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2562.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 353. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2562

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 353, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2562.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 353
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_373.jpg
Transcript C&SAREA PHILIPPI. 353 the time when they were written, which was probably later than the time of the Herods. P 1 bius however, mentions the name in connection with Antiochus the Great in B.C. 198. This place has' been known in history by a variety of names. Panias is one of the more ncient of them, and Banias is the most modern. Herod Philip rebuilt or enlarged it, and called it Caesarea Philippi (see page 345), the first part in honour of Augustus, and the second in honour of himself, and likewise to distinguish it from its sister town of Caesarea on the sea-coast. Caesarea Philippi is the name it bears in the New Testament. Agrippa II. enlarged it still further, and gave it the name of Neronias, in honour of the Emperor Nero, by whom large additions had been made to his territory. This was in a.d. 55, and the fact is attested by coins of Agrippa II. which still exist. The Babylonian Talmud states that Leshem was an old name of Panias. Panium, a name found in Josephus, refers properly to the cave which was one of the sources of the Jordan (see page 348). Still other names to be met with in ancient writings are Kisrin, Caesarea of Panias, and Belinas or Balinas. The last is important because it is probably the oldest name of the place, and carries us back beyond the worship of Pan to the time when the altars of Baal stood here, and the rites of a very ancient religion were practised in and about this famous grotto. The two names Balinas and Panias could easily be confounded until the latter completely supplanted the former. Panias had at the beginning of our era a variety of masters. In B.C. 36 it was included in the grant made by Antony to Cleopatra. After her death it was farmed out to Zenodorus. Herod the Great next came into possession of it, by whom it was bequeathed to his son Herod Philip. At his death it reverted to the Emperor Tiberius, and was attached to the Roman province of Syria. Scarcely four years passed before it was given by Caligula in a.d. 37 to Herod Agrippa I., who died in a.d. 44. It then came successively under the procurators Cuspius Fadus, Tiberius Alexander, and Cumanus. At last it was bestowed upon Herod Agrippa II. in a.d. 53, to whom it belonged during the Jewish War, or from a.d. 66 to 70. Under Herod Philip, Caesarea Philippi was not only greatly enlarged and beautified, but it enjoyed, perhaps, its most flourishing period. The character of this prince is in marked contrast 0 that of either of his brothers, Archelaus and Herod Antipas. Philip was a mild ruler, and i who had the good of his subjects and his province at heart. On his journeys he was customed to take with him his judges, so that the cases brought before him might be lispatched at once (" Antiquities," xviii. 4, 6). This fact is so wholly unlike the habit of 1 Pnnces> who court delay, that it is worthy of special notice. He seems furthermore -en peculiar in other respects. For example, he remained the most of his life and after he had transformed the humble village Bethsaida into the beautiful and -'ty Julias, he built there for himself an elegant and costly tomb. In his last years he fell with Salome and married her. She was the daughter of her husband's half-brother P an Herodias, and danced at the feast of Herod Antipas when John the Baptist was , at tlme> A-D- 3J> she was about fourteen years of age, and was married ong after. As her husband died late in a.d. 33, she must still have been a mere 46