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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 352
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 352. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2560.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 352. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2560

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 352, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2560.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 352
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_371.jpg
Transcript 352 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. of running brooks. Travellers who have made a tedious journey of weeks over the mountains and rough fields of Western Palestine will welcome the olive-groves and cool streams of Banias as a place of rest. Poplars, oleanders, reeds, and flowering shrubs exist here in great abundance. With this rich soil and ample supply of water there could be no lack of vegetation. (See pages 344, 345, and 348.) The ordinary way of reaching the town is by crossing a bridge, which creeping plants and vines have nearly covered, and passing through a low gateway in a section of an ancient wall Beyond this a few houses are seen, and the road very soon leads directly into a stream. The water, the broken pavement, and the scattered boulders are soon left behind, and the groves of walnut and olive trees at the north of the town are reached. The city was fortified, and the old wall and moat can still be traced. The present houses are few in number and the people are poor. In such a delightful place as this they ought to be happy and in comfortable circumstances, but on the contrary they seem to be very wretched. On the flat roofs of the houses temporary lodging-places are built of reeds and boughs. They are raised a few feet above the roofs, and the inhabitants climb into them and sleep. These booths are cooler than the rooms below, and besides in this way the people avoid the scorpions which infest these old ruins (see page 351). A short distance to the north-east of the town is a bold cliff of limestone not far from one hundred feet high. At its base is a large cave, of which the mouth is obstructed by immense blocks of stone that have fallen from above. What its original shape or dimensions were cannot now be told, for earthquakes, judging by the fallen rocks, have entirely changed the face of the cliff immediately about the cave. From underneath these great stones issue the copious streams which have caused the spot to be named the Fountain of the Jordan (see page 348). The waters form at once a single stream, almost deserving to be called a river, which foams and dashes over rocks and fragments of ancient buildings, and is soon hid from sight by the trees and reeds which line its banks. The cave and fountain must have been much more extensive in former times than at present, for the place was ear 3 chosen as a sanctuary, and Herod the Great, in honour of Augustus, built here a splendi temple of white marble. Josephus says : " There is a very fine cave in a mountain un e which there is a great cavity in the earth, and the cavern is abrupt and prodigiously deep anc full of still water; over it hangs a vast mountain, and under the caverns arise the springs the Jordan. Herod adorned this place, which was already a very remarkable one, still ur by the erection of this temple, which he dedicated to Ceesar" (" Antiquities," xv. 10, 3)- the parallel passage in the "Wars" he describes "a yawning chasm" in the cave, descends to an immeasurable depth containing a vast collection of still water, hitner unfathomable by any length of line" (i. 21, 3). Whether these statements are strict!) not, they justify us in the conclusion that the appearance of the place is now unli re was twenty centuries ago. Just beyond the cave are some niches that were cut in the cliff (see page 349). These were designed for statues, and the roof 01 eaci shaped. From the fragments of inscriptions remaining we learn that Pan was wors pp