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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 350
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 350. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 350. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2558

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 350, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 350
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_369.jpg
Transcript 35° PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. (see page 341). Its course, however, as it goes to join the latter, can scarcely be traced, on account of the wilderness of oleanders and reeds which hide it from view. The place is not now inhabited, and one can roam at will over the site of ancient Dan, either shootino- birds or gathering flowers, studying its history or searching for antiquities. Unless one defies the marsh and struggles through the tall grass from point to point, he would see only a laro-e mound half a mile in diameter, perhaps sixty feet in height, destitute apparently of ruins, and certainly would not discover its strongly-marked artificial character. On one side of the mound are a good many trees of small growth, while near one of the springs stand side by side an oak and a terebinth, two beautiful trees of immense size, beneath whose branches are the graves of one or more Moslem saints (see page 343). Dan comes into notice fourteen centuries before Christ as a place that had been long settled, and one that enjoyed great prosperity. In fact, it appears to have been well known before that, or in Joshua's time, under the name of Leshem or Laish ; and subsequently, when taken by the Danites, it received a new name which has been preserved even to the present day. The men of this tribe who went on the expedition " to spy out the land," as related in Judges xviii., seem to have been freebooters ; for at the home of Micah in Mount Ephraim, where they were well entertained, they stole not only his priest, but his idols and all that belonged to his worship, " an ephod and teraphim, and a graven image, and a molten image," and these they carried to Dan, where " they set up the graven image " and worshipped it. With regard to the report of these spies, who said, " We have seen the land and behold it is very good, .... a large land, .... a place where there is no want of anything that is in the earth," we can testify from its present condition that, although they were robbers, they neither exaggerated nor conveyed false impressions. The Hebrew words translated " a large land mean broad on every side, and are strikingly descriptive of Dan, situated, as we have seen, in the middle of a vast and fertile plain. The very difficult verses in Judges xviii. 7, 10, 27, 28, appear to indicate that the old inhabitants of Laish lived in a quiet and peaceable manner, enjoying plenty, having no oppressors, devoting themselves, like the Sidonians, to the affairs 01 trade and commerce, possessing characteristics the very opposite of a warlike people, and hence they fell an easy prey to the swords of the Danites. History does not reach back to the time when the place was first settled, but there is evidence for supposing that it had been, as we have already indicated, a sanctuary before the conquest now referred to, and even long previous to the conquest of the country under Joshua. At a later time, in 975 B.C., Jeroboam set up here one of the golden calves which he made, and the place became at once a popular religioi centre (1 Kings xii. 28—30) ; a fact in keeping, no doubt, with its ancient character. As to geographical province with which it was connected, it is interesting to notice that, in the of Deuteronomy, Dan, including the region about it, is reckoned as belonging to Bashan [X& 22); while the Talmud, on the other hand, makes Caesarea Philippi belong to Upper ua 1 About one mile south of this mound is another called Tell Difneh, the Daphne of Josep ("Wars," iv. 1, 1), which he speaks of as "a spot delightful in various respects, a