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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 347
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 347. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2555.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 347. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2555

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 347, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2555.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 347
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_366.jpg
Transcript DAN. 347 ience of those who occupy them. Such dwellings are, of course, in constant danger of Kp* o- consumed by fire, and sometimes in a few moments the flames reduce an entire village hes Never elsewhere have we seen waterfowl so numerous as in this lake and among 1 se reeds. Every variety of Syrian bird which seeks the marshes exists here, but the lifficultv is to catch them. They have secure retreats to which the hunter cannot approach, id seem to be aware of their immunity from his destructive arts. The trees that are about the lake are likewise filled with birds, and the wilderness of flowers which cover the plain and marsh attract innumerable bees and winged insects, from which in their incessant flights a loud hum rises and fills the air on every side. To enjoy it fully, one must look down upon this landscape in both summer and winter—when the storm-clouds, resting black and frightful on the mountains to the north, cast their shadows over it; when the sun is rising or setting in splendour; and when the moon and stars from a clear sky pour down upon it their mild but full and steady light. The reeds which grow here so abundantly are manufactured into mats and sent to the markets in different parts of the country ; while the papyrus, if it were in the days of the Pharaohs or the Assyrian kings, would no doubt be highly valued as material for making r. We see no reason why it might not be made profitable to cultivate this plant for the same purpose in modern times. Our methods of making paper are different from those employed in remote ages, but in civilised lands there is a constantly increasing demand for suitable material that may be used in its manufacture. The present road from Hunin to the plain (see page 340) is somewhat difficult, but the distance is not great, and we soon pass, among the foot-hills, the village of Abil, which some scholars regard as the modern representative of Abel, and which seems to have been an mportant place in the early Hebrew history (2 Samuel xx. 14). The site is an admirable one, nd the appearance of the ground is such as to justify the belief that considerable ruins exist 0W the surface. The location also is to be noticed, since it was on or very near two main >utes leading from Damascus to Tyre and Sidon. Not far from Abil, on our way to the Any, we meet " the basaltic current again, which has poured in, filled the northern end of C plain, and gradually expanded till exhausted near the great marsh." Through this hard upon which the implements made by men have hardly any effect, the mountain-stream has « a channel which at some points is nearly two hundred feet deep, and along its bed the river ^ among great volcanic boulders, while the banks are lined with oleanders, willows, honey- *ir Md still other flowering shrubs and vines. The noise of the water and the chirping of e trees, together with the wild natural scenery, combine to make this place romantic An ancient bridge called Jisr el Ghujar spans the stream (see page 341), and rom it to Tell el Kady, or Dan (see page 343), is about three miles, which place wh a comParatively easy path. Here we find ourselves on a site of great antiquity, and profane history meet in some strange and thrilling events. The region itself & one. I he " lowlanders " of the country in the remotest times chose this point as