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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 346
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 346. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 346. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2554

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 346, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 346
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_365.jpg
Transcript 346 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. sons the cultivated fields will be carpeted with green and the rest of the earth with flowers Among the villages passed on this route, Meis is the largest, and is inhabited by the Metawileh who have an intense hatred of Christians, although they might not treat them with violence The distance between Kedes (see page 334) and Hunin (see page 337) is perhaps seven miles, and north of Meis we find many traces of a Roman road, which fact is of importance as indicating one line of travel in ancient times. A shprt distance before reaching Hunin the road passes over the summit of a hill which commands a fine view in every direction. On the right in the foreground is the Jordan Valley, the Huleh Lake, and the vast marsh above it (see page 340). Beyond, to the east, is the great table-land of Gaulanitis stretching towards Damascus, and dotted in its western portion by a line of volcanic hills. North of these is the grand dome of Hermon. Still farther in the north is the range of the Lebanon Mountains, the highest summits of which, for several months in the year, are capped with snow. To the west rises the old castle of Tibnin, and before us lie the castle and village of Hunin. Whoever first fortified this place selected a commanding position on the main route leading from Damascus past Banias to Tyre. That this point has been an important one is attested by the fact of the variety of ruins which exist here; for not only do Turkish and Arab work appear, but also that which belongs to the Crusades; and still mingled with these or underneath them all are abundant traces of Roman and Phoenician times. The north end appears to be the most ancient, and was surrounded by a moat dug in the rock to the depth of twenty feet, and which was thirty or forty feet in width (see page 337). The large bevelled stones which exist in some of the most ancient ruins of the country are found also in these walls, and the place was one of great strength. It commands a fine view of its sister castle above Banias, on the way to Damascus ; and as in ancient times methods were known for signalling from point to point, the soldiers in these two fortresses in times of danger no doubt communicated to each other across the great Huleh Plain. This plain, including the marsh and lake, as seen from this point, forms a picture of unusual beauty, especially for parched and rocky Palestine. The greatest length of the valley is not far from sixteen miles, with an average breadth of six miles. The lake proper is four miles long an many wide, but in addition six or more miles to the north are occupied by reeds, among v the streams not only wind, but form here and there miniature lakes, adding variety to surface, which otherwise would be an unbroken mass of green. Into this dense jungle o and papyrus it is impossible to penetrate. We have sometimes made the attempt on no at points where there seemed to be a small opening, but never succeeded in going any & distance. So far as we went the bottom was hard, but this may not be the case in eve ) On the south, west, and north the lake and marsh are bordered by a wide and ferti e p Here the farmer is always rewarded by abundant crops. A few tents may be seen an or more of villages counted ; but it will be observed, if one is accustomed to look this plain at different seasons, that the villages do not always occupy the same They are, in fact, reed villages, and the houses can easily be moved from place to p <-