Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 342
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 342. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 342. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2550

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 342, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 342
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_361.jpg
Transcript 342 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Assyrian kings were among the commonest events of that early period and time, and ao-ain not only all of Palestine, but Moab (see page 9) and Edom as well, were overrun by their armies; but on the occasion here referred to, while Gilead and Galilee were swept by the conquerors, Samaria and Judaea appear to have escaped. The student of the Bible, however, will be attracted to this point because it is the site of one of the cities of refuge. Even before the Hebrews entered the Promised Land a singular provision was introduced into the law of Moses with regard to those who should take the life of their fellow-man. In case of premeditated murder the offender was to be slain, even if he had to be taken from God's altar—to them the holiest place on earth; but if any caused the death of another by accident or without premeditation, such were to be allowed to live, provided they fled to certain appointed places, and conformed to certain prescribed regulations (Exodus xxi. 12—14). Joshua was therefore commanded, " when he had passed over Jordan into the land of Canaan," to appoint six cities of refuge, "that the slayer may flee thither which killeth any person at unawares. They shall be unto you cities for refuge from the avenger; that the manslayer die not until he stand before the congregation in judgment" (Numbers xxxv. 11, 12). This provision was not to shield the guilty, but to protect the innocent, and in cases of doubt to give a person an opportunity of fair trial. Accordingly, there were set apart and devoted to that purpose, " Kedesh in Galilee in Mount Naphtali (see page 334), and Shechem in Mount Ephraim (see page 243), and Kirjath- arba, which is Hebron, in the mountain of Judah. And on the other side Jordan, by Jericho eastward, they assigned Bezer in the wilderness upon the plain out of the tribe of Reuben, and Ramoth in Gilead out of the tribe of Gad, and Golan (Jaulan) in Bashan (see page 340) out of the tribe of Manasseh " (Joshua xx. 7, 8). In the early Jewish writings we are informed that these cities were located at central points, and that they were in pairs, those on the west ot the Jordan corresponding to those on the east. Moreover, the cities were so selected that the distance between them from north to south was about equal. It was also required that the roads leading to them should be broad, that streams should be bridged, that every obstacle which might hinder one, or against which he might dash his foot, should be removed, and tha at crossings or doubtful points finger-posts should be erected lest the fugitive should mista re the way. This fact is alluded to in Hosea vi., where the high-road between Shechem in t e west and Gilead {i.e. Ramoth Gilead, now Gerash) in the east had become infested with robbers. The manslayer who had taken refuge in one of these cities was to be restore his country and friends on the death of the high priest; and it is a curious fact that mothers of the high priests used to feed and clothe these fugitives, so that they might not pray for the death of their sons. If, however, the fugitive died before the high priest, his bones were to be restored to his friends after the death of the latter. While these very ancient are interesting, they seem also to be exceedingly wise and just We have at different times approached Kedesh Naphtali from the north, south, east, a nd west, and have always been impressed with the beauty of its situation (see page 334)- Directly