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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 339
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 339. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 339. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2547

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 339, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 339
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_358.jpg
Transcript THE PHCENICIANS. 339 could justly claim the highest antiquity. Isaiah speaks of Tyre as the " daughter of Zidon " teciii 12), and in our private collection there is a coin with an inscription in Phoenician characters which reads, " Sidon, the mother of Kamba, Hippo, Cittium, (and) Tyre." This interesting relic would seem to indicate that the four places mentioned were colonies of Sidon. Even in Homer's time, the choicest works of art came from Sidon, and the most costly offerings to the gods were the product of its looms. The purple dye of Tyre had a world-wide celebrity on account of the durability of its beautiful tints, and its manufacture proved a source of abundant wealth to the inhabitants of that city. Homer speaks of Sidon as " abounding in works of brass," and praises it for the drinking- vessels of gold and silver which her skilful workmen had made. From among the artists of Tyre, Solomon employed at least one master workman " cunning to work in gold and in silver, in brass and in Iron, in stone and in timber, in purple, in crimson and in fine linen, and in the engraving of precious stones" (2 Chron. ii. 7, 14). These hints will indicate the progress of the nation in these special arts. The Phoenicians were celebrated in ancient times for the manufacture of glass, and some of the specimens of their work that have been preserved are still the wonder of mankind. Here where its manufacture is supposed to have originated, and in later times elsewhere, it was produced in such abundance, that before the commencement of our era glass was in ordinary use for drinking-vessels, and a glass bowl could be bought for a penny. On the other hand, so much skill had been devoted to its manufacture that elegant and costly articles were produced, and for a single pair of glass vases Nero paid a sum equal to twenty-two thousand dollars. The Phoenicians were the connecting link between the civilisation of the East and the vast and unknown regions of the West. Their ships went to all parts of the world as then known, and news of remote peoples, conquests, and discoveries would be brought first to Phoenicia and disseminated among themselves and their immediate neighbours. They appear also to have been renowned in ancient times for marine stories, or what we call " sailors' yarns; " for, like seafaring men in all ages, they entertained their own people, as well as those in the distant ports which they visited, with either strange or amusing, but still too often fabulous, accounts of ands and seas, men and other beings which they had seen or which had appeared to them on the great deep. Oi the shipping of Phoenicia, in which she surpassed all other nations, it may be sufficient state that when Xerxes invaded Greece the Persian navy consisted of twelve hundred nremes, and of these " the Phoenicians, with the Syrians of Palestine," furnished three hundred, one-fourth of the whole number (Herodotus, bk. vii., ch. 89); and Xenophon has described >ome length a Phoenician ship that he himself saw, which visited Athens, and which seems to ■ attracted as much attention when it first appeared as the Great Eastern did in modern times. Th ne commerce and business of Phoenicia would bring wealth, and wealth would bring power anrl 1 • ease, and in time a luxurious mode of life, which could not fail of influencing