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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 338
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 338. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 338. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2546

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 338, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 338
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_357.jpg
Transcript 338 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. The land was not wholly conquered, and some of the original inhabitants were allowed to remain. Eighteen centuries ago the distinction between Upper and Lower Galilee was well defined and understood. The boundaries are given by Josephus (" Wars," iii. 3, 1), but it is impossible to identify several of the places mentioned. The Talmud defines Upper Galilee as the region where the sycamore grows, and Lower Galilee where it does not; but this definition is no longer of any service. In these two parts of Galilee no less than fourteen strongholds were fortified by Josephus in the Jewish War (" Life," xxxvii. ; " Wars," ii. 20, 6) ; and this number does not include several other places of strength which are mentioned either incidentally or as the scene of a bloody struggle. The statement of the Jewish historian that Galilee had two hundred and four cities and villages, the smallest of which numbered above fifteen thousand inhabitants, has been regarded as an exaggeration ; but, when all the facts are considered, it will probably be found to be correct. As military governor of Galilee, Josephus raised without difficulty an army " of above a hundred thousand young men ;" and there is evidence that in addition to this force, he had an equal number of men enrolled who were not actually called into the field. In a.d. 39, twenty-seven years previous to the time just referred to, Herod Antipas was on trial at Rome, charged with preparing to levy war against the Romans, and the fact was developed that in a single armory he had armour collected for seventy thousand men. This, it must be noted, was in a time of comparative peace. These facts are mentioned in order to convey some idea of the military strength of this province at the beginning of our era. With these should be stated another, namely, that Galilee bore, unaided, the whole brunt of that terrible war during the first year of its progress, and that, too, when the sixty thousand veteran troops with which her young men had to contend were fresh for the conflict, and were led by Vespasian, the best general in the Roman Empire. The backbone of the rebellion was broken when Galilee was subdued ; but in that bloody year one hundred and fifty thousand of her people perished, and among these the flower of her youth had fallen. Even Vespasian praised the conduct of the Galileans ; but the ranks of his own army had been thinned in the struggle, and he was obliged to order time for rest and recruiting. The people of Upper Galilee could not but be powerfully affected by their neighbours on the sea-coast, with whom they were in constant intercourse. Twenty miles from the Mediterranean would, at almost any point, take one into the heart of Galilee; and the inhabitants of these two sections, living in such close proximity to each other, must have been to a large extent identical in their interests. It was not a small matter for the Galileans be thus situated, at the very gates of the market of the world. The ships of the people v 10 controlled so largely the trade and commerce of all civilised lands were at their very doors. Strabo says of the people of Tyre, " The great number and magnitude of their colonie and cities are proofs of their maritime skill and power" (xvi. 2, 24). While both lyre Sidon were distinguished and illustrious cities, it was disputed even in ancient times av