Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 331
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 331. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2539.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 331. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2539

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 331, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2539.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 331
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_350.jpg
Transcript ■i SAFED. 33i murdered, and their leader being flayed alive. In 1799 Napoleon stationed in the castle here a o-arrison of four hundred French troops. Three centuries ago it boasted of seventeen synao-oones and a Hebrew printing establishment. Subsequently this became an important centre for the publication of Hebrew books, and in 1833 employment was given to no less than thirty persons. On account of a severe earthquake in 1759, by which many Jews perished, a laro-e number of the inhabitants left the city, and a century ago it had but five synagogues. Its schools have at different times enjoyed a wide reputation, and besides the works issued from its press, some of the writers and rabbis who flourished here have been eminent men. In 1812 a plague swept over Galilee, and it is said that hardly a fifth of the population of Safed remained alive. As the place comprises not only a village but a fortress, it has suffered in nearly all the wars that have desolated the country. That under Ibrahim Pasha, 1832—1840, may be mentioned as a time when the Jewish inhabitants especially were robbed and killed without mercy ; and it was only by the combined influence of the foreign consuls of the country that their persecutors were forced to stop their cruel and bloody work. But more shocking than the barbarities of war seem the details of the terrible earthquake which visited the city in 1837. By this awful calamity not only the city but the castle itself was reduced to ruins, and many occupants of the latter were buried beneath its fallen walls and towers. It has been estimated that in this town as many as five thousand persons perished, although the number could never be accurately determined. At least fifteen hundred Jews were killed, and, as the shock was sudden, most of them died instantaneously; while it is known that some who were crushed beneath the ruins lingered for several days before relief could reach them, or death put an end to their misery. The details of that catastrophe, as given by the Rev. William M. Thomson, are too painful to be repeated (" Missionary Herald," Boston, 1837, PP- 433—441). We have referred to the Jewish enterprise for which Safed has been famous during three or four centuries past; but this region is full of monuments which belong to a much more nourishing period of Jewish history, namely, that of the second to the fourth century of the Christian era. After the conquest of Judaea by Vespasian and Titus, and especially after the nnal destruction of their liberties under Hadrian, a.d. 132—135, the Jews repaired to Galilee, where for many generations they enjoyed considerable freedom from persecution. Ihe Sanhedrim was removed successively from Jerusalem to Yabneh or Jamnia, Usha, hefaram, Beth-Shearim, Sepphoris (see page 286), and at last to Tiberias (see page 300). All the first two of these places were in Galilee. During this period of prosperity they built *any synagogues and established a number of celebrated schools. The remains of at least re ve of these synagogues have been brought to light, and they reveal a good many important s with regard to these ancient structures. At Meiron (see page 330), one hour and a half *-west of Safed (see page 328), the remains of one exist in very good preservation. The or it was excavated in a hill, and its western wall and floor are of solid rock. There is