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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 327
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 327. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2535.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 327. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2535

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 327, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2535.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 327
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_346.jpg
Transcript SAFED. 327 tural caverns no doubt existed in this limestone formation, a great many of these caves -must he looked upon as artificial. Immense labour must have been expended in excavating them nd fitting them for dwellings. They have, however, no history. No doubt robbers, distressed and terrified people flying from oppression or war, Christian monks, and the cave-dwellers of a remote antiquity, have in turn occupied them at different periods. Akhbara, a little farther north, is mentioned by Josephus as " an extremely rocky situation " which he fortified (" Life," 37 ; " Wars," ii. 20, 6). This expression conveys no adequate idea of these cliffs, which form one of the wildest places in Syria. The labyrinth of passages and interior apartments can perhaps never be explored. There may have been a town connected with these caves, or they themselves may have been more accessible formerly, for the Talmud mentions the fact that Rabbi Yose had here a school. Except that it is wilder, the general character of Akhbara is like that of Leimon (see page 323), and is referred to because it is mentioned in history, while Leimon is not. We have already learned something of the famous caves in Wady Hamam (see pages 305 and 307), where in past ages tragic scenes have been enacted. Besides the three places now mentioned, we may refer to the Jordan Valley, where, in the mountain walls which line its eastern side, thousands of these holes appear. They were once the abode of Christian hermits, and, previous to them, of the Essene anchorites, who existed in great numbers in this valley and about the Dead Sea before the time of Christ. In some of those about the mouth of the Jabbok (Zurka), we found decorations in red paint, which showed considerable artistic skill. In this connection we may notice the vast caves at 'Arak el Emir, east of the Jordan, which Hyrcanus, before 175 B.C., fitted up with apartments of all kinds, designing them as a place of refuge ; and also to the underground city, with its network of streets and avenues, at Der'a, which is supposed to represent Edrei, one of the capitals of Og, king of Bashan. There must be others still in that region quite as extensive as any that are now known, which have not yet been discovered ; for the Crusaders speak of some of great size which were three stories in height, while in Strabo, and particularly in the Talmud, we find almost fabulous accounts of the extent of various natural caves in different parts of the country. We have already said that Safed (see page 328) is the highest village in Galilee ; and after sweltering for two months in the fearful climate of the Jordan Valley, we have found the fresh mountain air of this region very delightful and invigorating. Being situated on the ummit of a hill, one would expect to find the town tolerably clean. On the contrary, the -e s are filthy, and there does not appear to be any desire to improve them. Nevertheless, ^ reckoned as one of the sacred cities of the Jews—Tiberias, Hebron, and Jerusalem being ers. The soil in this elevated district is exceedingly fertile, because the clouds collect e it, and rain and dew are abundant. The olive, fig, pomegranate, and vine flourish here, besides many other trees and shrubs. e in the month of February, when approaching this place from the north, we were a en by a sudden and violent storm, which lasted nearly all the afternoon. There were