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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 326
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 326. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2534.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 326. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2534

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 326, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2534.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 326
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_345.jpg
Transcript 326 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the south is Wady Semakh, where is the site of Gergesa, and above that the ruins of Gamala crowning a bold summit. Far in the distance the southern end of the lake is seen, and the broad valley of the Jordan. Near the point where the river leaves the lake appears the mound which represents all that remains of the once large and wealthy city of Tarichaea (Kerak). Midway along the western shore is Tiberias, and farther north the few huts at Magdala. The cliffs which line Wady Hamam on either side open like the jaws of some hideous monster, and beyond and above them rise the Horns of Hattin. In Christ's time the region about the Sea of Galilee was thronged with intelligent, busy men, and covered with the marks of civilisation and prosperity. But all is changed; and the only signs of life at present are a few boats on the lake, a few ploughmen in the fields, and the cattle or tents of the Bedawin on these sacred hillsides. Still, although in desolation, this region is to us one of the most delightful places on earth. No church or cathedral in civilised lands brings us so near to the Divine Master as a day spent on these lonely shores. While carrying on our work east of the Jordan, we made an effort to spend the Sabbath by this lake whenever it was possible to do so. We have been across it many times, and examined every locality north and south of it, and on both the eastern and western banks; we have seen it in calm and storm, in summer and winter; and its beauty grows upon us. Like Niagara, like some of the lakes of Scotland or Switzerland, one cannot appreciate its attractions by a single glance; they are developed by study. And he who goes from point to point about this hallowed lake, and observes the changing aspects of sea and mountains, will find its scenery to be diversified instead of monotonous and uniform, and that some of its views possess elements of unusual loveliness and grandeur. As we descended from Safed (see pages 328, 329) to the Sea of Galilee by way of Khan Jubb Yusef, we shall return by the other route previously indicated, starting from the north-west corner of the plain of Gennesaret at the large ruin called Abu Shusheh. Fine squared stones project from the ground at many points, and it is possible that this also is the site of a once- important town. There is a large mill here, run by water from the copious stream of the Rubudiyeh. A few minutes north of this ruin we cross Wady el Amud, which in its upper portion is called Wady Leimon (see pages 323, 325). This is a large stream, and is one of the main sources for irrigating the plain of Gennesaret. The path leads up to the east of this wady, across a rough plateau, and meets the stream aeain under the cliffs of Akhbara. But it is also possible to go up the wady itself. Although the task is difficult, the adventurer will be fully repaid by the wild and savage aspect of this mountain gorge. At many points the walls are perpendicular, and they rise to a height of six hundred or one thousand feet. They often spring from the edge of the stream, so as to leave no path on either side. These walls of rock are perforated with innumerable openings which lead to caves. Very many of them are at present inaccessible. They may have been reached by some interior and secret passages, or the face of the rock may have been injured by earthquakes, so that the proper approaches have been destroyed. Swarms of birds now occupy them, and have here a secure retreat. While