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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 324
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 324. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2532.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 324. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2532

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 324, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2532.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 324
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_343.jpg
Transcript 324 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. are mentioned, and also the plains and marshes about the Sea of Galilee and Lake Huleh (see page 340), where the king used to resort for this purpose. In his busy life, and occupied as he was with building, carrying on wars, overcoming intrigues, and pacifying the arbitrary powers at Rome, one would not suppose he would have much time left for hunting. But his expeditions of this kind are frequently mentioned, and there seems to have been a special stable where his hunting-horses were kept, and also his hunting-spears and other outfit; and besides, there was one man who held the office of " the king's chief hunter " (" Antiquities," xvi. 10, 3). The old mill at 'Ain et Tabighah will attract attention, partly because its walls and arches are somewhat dilapidated, but chiefly because they are covered with grass and vines, which, with the water trickling over the sides and dashing over the stones, give the whole a beautiful and romantic appearance (see page 317). From 'Ain et Tabighah to Tell Hum (see pages 320 and 321) the distance is about forty minutes, and the path is a difficult one because of the stony nature of the ground, as already indicated. Tell Hum itself is so thickly overgrown with thistles and weeds of every kind, that at certain seasons it is almost impossible to get about. Among the ruins the absence of blocks of stone will be noticed, and instead, the extensive use of boulders in all the common houses. In fact, the ruins, as such, are of a very inferior kind. With the exception of what is thought to have been a synagogue, including a large building which at some time enclosed it, Tell Hum has no ruins that would be worth visiting. The remains of this synagogue have been referred to as an evidence that Tell Hum represents the site of Capernaum of the New Testament; but the preservation of these ruins is such as to justify the conclusion that they date from the second to the fourth century of our era, rather than from the time of Christ. Besides, Tell Hum is two and a half or more miles from the point where the Roman road touched the lake, and hence would be a most unlikely place for a custom-house. It has no remains of a road or of a castle, and the unimportant character of the ruins has just been noticed. If Capernaum was here, it could have no possible connection with the plain of Gennesaret, which, we infer from the Gospels, should be the case. The place possesses no harbour, and in fact hardly a landing- place for a boat. This would be quite true in a storm, or at any time if the sea were very rough. At some point near here, on the shore, an interesting event in Josephus's life took place, and we refer to it because in that connection mention is made by him of Capernaum. His troops attacked the Roman forces under Sylla, and were gaining an advantage over them, when the horse which Josephus rode fell into a quagmire, throwing him to the ground and dislocating his wrist. He was carried into the village of Capernaum and attended by his physicians; but a fever set in, and during the night he was taken, probably by boat, to Tarichaea (Kerak), at the other end of the lake. These boas abound even in this rocky soil, and at certain seasons those on horseback must be constantly on their guard if they would avoid accidents. The view from this rough shore is a charming one. To the cast is the plain of Batiheh, corresponding in general appearance to the plain of Gennesaret on the west. Farther to