Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 322
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 322. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 322. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2530

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 322, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 322
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_341.jpg
Transcript 322 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. rounded stones; but below this, at a depth of four or more feet from the surface, a wall was struck, which was followed some distance, and which at last turned an angle and ran in another direction. This wall was built of limestone, the blocks finely squared and faced and the work belongs to the best class of Eastern ruins. The peasants had dug at other points near by, and had come upon walls, pottery, and remains of various kinds. When the spades struck the yellow earth full of smoothed stones, almost any person would have declared it to be utter folly to expect to find debris and ruins below it; but the peasants knew that even underneath this there was material, marble and limestone, which they could convert into lime. Excavations here might reveal the extent of this buried town, and possibly its name. Considering all the facts as they are known at present—the Roman road touching the lake at this point, the suitableness of the place for a custom-house, the garrison, the remains of a castle, and important ruins under the surface—we think the evidence is very strong for regarding this as the site of Capernaum, our Lord's "own city" (Matt. ix. i). (See page 313.) About twenty minutes beyond this point there is another copious fountain called 'Ain et Tabighah (see page 317). There are here a few ruins, and around the fountain itself is a strong octagon wall, designed to raise the water to a higher level, so that it might be carried over the small adjacent plain, and by means of the trench in the cliff at Khan Minyeh to the plain of Gennesaret as well (see page 313) ; for 'Ain et Tin lies so near the edge of the lake that the north end of the plain could not have been irrigated by it. The top of this reservoir is at present fifty-one feet above the lake. In neither of these two fountains is the water very cool, and that in 'Ain et Tabighah is besides slightly brackish. Some eminent scholars regard this as the site of Bethsaida, the home of Philip, Andrew, and Peter (John i. 44). It is called a "city," and hence must have been a place of some importance. Against this the absence of extensive ruins cannot be urged as an argument, when we consider the practice that has been carried on for ages of removing building materials from one place to another. Scholars are now nearly unanimous in the opinion that there were two Bethsaidas, an eastern and a western. About the one on the east of the Jordan there can be no dispute, for the site of the residence and burial-place of Herod Philip is well known. The name Bethsaida is said to mean House of Fish, but it can just as properly mean House or Place of Hunting. In the Hebrew it is invariably used in the latter sense. The water of the lake at this point is alive with fish, and a native requested us very urgently that we would not shoot near there, lest the fish should be frightened away. But the clusters of oleanders along the shore, the nubk or dom trees scattered on the slopes above it, and especially the thickets of reeds and papyrus about Khan Minyeh, are the resort of many kinds of birds, which, with the waterfowl in the lake, make this region a capital hunting-groun (Page 313)' We obtained here, for our natural history collection, cormorants, grebes, Smym kingfishers, purple gallinules, bitterns, egrets, herons, spur-wing plover, pigeons, partridges, a gulls ; and among the latter was a magnificent eagle-gull, which spread five feet eleven mcbd