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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 319
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 319. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2527.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 319. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2527

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 319, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2527.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 319
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_338.jpg
Transcript CAPERNAUM. 3i9 The industries of Galilee, and likewise the activity and enterprise of its inhabitants, are a rvino- of notice, because they throw light on the particular region where Christ lived, and h people among whom He laboured. His lot was cast, not in a remote and desolate portion f Palestine, but in that section which, compared with Samaria or Judaea, was the most fertile and densely populated. Nazareth, the home of Jesus, may have been a comparatively quiet place, but it cannot have been so insignificant as has been sometimes represented. It is always spoken of as a "citv" and no one can deny ^at ft was " beautiful for situation;" while there is evidence for saying that it contained fifteen thousand or twenty thousand inhabitants (see page 281). Sepphoris (see page 286), the capital of the province, three miles distant, was within sight of the hill at Nazareth (see page 279); and every day of Christ's life he could look down upon the plain of Esdraelon (see page 258), Mount Carmel (see page 286), and the broad Mediterranean, or up to Tabor (see page 261) and the splendid dome of Mount Hermon (see page 334)- A very significant fact in the life of our Lord is that, when he began his public ministry, he left Nazareth and took up his residence at Capernaum, then a stirring and beautiful town upon the shore of the Sea of Galilee. This was an important centre of business and travel. Men from all sections of the country, and from foreign parts as well, would be found here, and likewise people of every class ; and from this point, better than from any other in all Judaea, perhaps, news of the wonderful Healer and Teacher would go south to Jerusalem and Eoypt, west to the seaports of Caesarea and Ptolemais and thence to Rome, and east to Damascus and the Euphrates. In those active times news was carried farther and travelled more rapidly than is generally supposed. The Mediterranean was covered with ships; long caravans, freighted with treasures, came from the far East, and returned thither again ; and on the substantial Roman roads which covered the country men travelled one hundred and sometimes two hundred miles in twenty-four hours. According to our own estimate, there were in the country east of the Jordan alone, between Damascus on the north and Petra on the south, no less than five hundred miles of these elegant roads, perfect sections of which, together with a few bridges, still remain at certain points, enduring monuments of Roman enterprise and skill. Such a road, as we have before stated, came from the south through Wady Hamam, crossed the plain of Gennesaret, touched the lake at Capernaum, and went on thence to Damascus. Some important facts with regard to Capernaum are well known, among which may be mentioned that it had a custom house or station. Here Christ found Matthew, one of the collectors of customs, whom he called to be his disciple (Matt. ix. 9). It had a garrison, and one officer connected with it—whether the highest or not we do not know—was of the rank of a centurion (Matt. viii. 5). The place is spoken of as a " city," and it had one or more synagogues (Luke iv. 31 ; vii. 5). These facts are sufficient to indicate its importance among the towns of Galilee. The point where the great route from north to south touched the lake