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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 318
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 318. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2526.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 318. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2526

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 318, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2526.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 318
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_337.jpg
Transcript 318 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. labour. Meadow and pasture-land were turned into tillage, because the cultivation of grain and fruit was found to be more profitable than the raising of cattle. Of the productions of this province, the more important seem to have been fish, wine wheat, fruits, and oil. The Rabbis said, " It is easier to raise a legion, i.e. a forest of olive- trees, in Galilee, than to raise one child in Judaea." Both Syrians and Phoenicians drew their supplies of oil from this region, and the traffic in this commodity alone proved a source of wealth to the Galileans (" Wars," ii. 21, 2). Gischala (El Jish), only six miles from Safed (see page 328), was a famous centre for the production of oil; and at Jotapata, when that place was besieged, the supply was so abundant that it was freely used by the inhabitants in repellino- the assaults of the enemy. Large quantities of it were heated and poured down on all sides upon the Romans, which soon scattered their ranks. Their troops, scalded, rolled headlong from the ramparts in excruciating agony. From the particulars given by Josephus, we learn that this was a terrible and effective as well as a singular means of defence (" Wars," iii. 7, 28). In Christ's time oil was a common article in the treatment of the sick; and Herod the Great, in his last illness at Jericho, was almost killed by being plunged into a vessel of oil, when his physicians hoped that thereby he might obtain relief (" Wars," i. 33, 5). But the fish and the fisheries of the Sea of Galilee had then a world-wide reputation. The choicest kinds abounded in this lake, and some varieties existed here similar to those found in the Nile. Tarichaea was noted for its extensive " fish-factories," and from the business of fishing more than one of the towns upon the shore are said to have derived their names. People came hither even from Jerusalem, especially just before the great feasts, to fish in these waters, and thus provide means of support for the multitudes that, on those occasions, flocked to the Temple. The Jews distinguished sharply between clean and unclean fish, which custom may be referred to in the words of our Lord, "They gathered the good into vessels, but cast the bad away " (Matt. xiii. 48). Certain places in Galilee were also noted for particular productions of manufactured articles. Thus the olives of Bethshean (Beisan), which was called " the Gate of Paradise," were highly praised, and likewise the fine linen garments which were there produced. Safed (see page 328) was celebrated for its honey; Shikmonah for its pomegranates; Akhbara for the raising of pheasants. Sigona furnished the best wine. Arbela (see page 307) was celebrated for the manufacture of cloth ; Capernaum (see page 313) and Chorasin for the raising of wheat; Sepphoris (see page 286) for the production of grain and fruit; Sichin and Kefr Chananyah for the manufacture of pottery. Certain places are mentioned where grain-merchants were accustomed to congregate in the interests of their line of trade. Even Magdala— Mejdel— (see pages 308 and 311) boasted of three hundred shops where pigeons for sacrifice were sold. About this place the indigo-plant flourished then, as now, and the Talmud calls it " the city of colour." More definitely, one portion of the city was called uthe tower of dyers," and here were eighty shops where fine woollen cloth was made. Moreover, the women of Galilee were widely celebrated for a certain kind of linen fabric, in the production of which they were specially skilled.