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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 315
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 315. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 315. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2523

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 315, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 315
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_334.jpg
Transcript GENNESARET. 3*5 hore is seen at a glance. West of the plain of Gennesaret there is a wall of hills through hich the gorge of Wady Hamam (see page 305) is cut, and on' the opposite or eastern side of the sea the wall of mountains appears like a great bank of earth deeply furrowed by wild ravines. These two banks of mountains not only continue to the southern end of the lake, but throughout the entire course of the Jordan Valley; and from where we stand we can look down the chasm in which the Jordan flows until river, valley, and mountains are lost in the distance. At present the only inhabited places about the Sea of Galilee are Tiberias and Mejdel (see pa°*e 311)' wh^e *n Christ's time there were upon its shores no less than nine cities, besides numerous villages which dotted the surrounding hillsides and plains. Hence, whether our attention is directed to the land itself or merely to the inhabitants, the contrast between the present and the past is a painful one. The people of to-day are poor and oppressed. They are without ambition or any inspiring hopes for the future; and under the present o-overnment it is not likely that anything effective can be done to alleviate their wretchedness. The plain of Gennesaret (see page 308), although only about one mile wide and a little less than three miles long, was the gem of Palestine, and, on account of its remarkable fertility, the Rabbis looked upon it as an earthly paradise. Its Hebrew name was thought to be significant of its character, and was explained as implying, " its fruit is sweet as the sound of a harp," or again as meaning the " garden of princes." Josephus speaks of it as " admirable both for its natural properties and its beauty." " Such," he says, " is the fertility of this soil that it rejects no plant, and accordingly all are here cultivated by the husbandman ; for so genial is the air that it suits every variety. The walnut, which delights beyond other trees in a wintry climate, grows here luxuriantly, together with the palm, which is nourished by heat; and near to these are figs and olives, to which a milder atmosphere has been assigned. One might style this an ambitious effort of Nature, doing violence to herself in bringing together plants of discordant habits, and an admirable rivalry of the seasons, each, as it were, asserting her right to the soil; for it not only possesses the extraordinary virtue of nourishing fruits of opposite climes, but also maintains a continual supply of them. Thus it produces those most royal of all, the grape and the fig, during ten months without intermission, while the other varieties ripen the year round." In addition to " the genial temperature of the air," he notices also the abundant irrigation of the plain, to which, in a good degree, its fertility was due ("Wars," iii. 10, 8). This praise might be regarded as extravagant had we not abundant testimony from other ancient sources to show that the statements of the Jewish historian are not exaggerations. The wide fame of this region and its productions may be judged from the fact that the Jews were accustomed to ask why the fruits of Gennesaret were not found in Jerusalem at the time of the feasts; and the reply was, " That no one may be tempted to come to the feasts merely for the sake of enjoying those fruits," instead of coming, as they should, solely for divine worship. In the rank soil of this plain grew the finest wheat of the land, and the wonderful climate of the region has been described as a " harmonious mingling of the seasons." While Gennesaret was justly looked upon as the garden of Palestine, if not of the