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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 314
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 314. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 314. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 314, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 314
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_333.jpg
Transcript 3,4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. hours. There are two routes which we have followed at different times : one leading to the east, past Khan Jubb Yusef to Khan Minyeh (see pages 311 and 313); and the other leading south under the majestic cliffs of Akhbara and just above the wild gorge of Leimon (see pao-es 323 and 325), and thence reaching the plain of Gennesaret at Abu Shusheh. Either way the roads are not free from difficulties, such as sharp ascents and fields of boulders; still both are interesting, if romantic scenery and other natural attractions are to be considered. Khan Jubb Yusef, which we pass on the first-mentioned route, about half-way between Safed (see page 328) and Khan Minyeh (see page 311), is distinguished now for its dirty water; but a curious Arab tradition makes it the place where Joseph was thrown into the pit by his brethren. At that point we strike the line of the Roman road running from the south to Damascus, and follow it to Khan Minyeh, where we touch the lake. This khan, which is now in ruins, has no antiquity to recommend it to our notice ; and indeed at this point there are, above ground, few ruins of any kind, and none that date from any remote period. This place bears also the name 'Ain et Tin, or Fountain of the Fig-tree, and one or two old but small and partly decayed fig-trees still exist by the spring, so that the name is not entirely without significance (see page 313). The high land which we have followed in coming from Khan Jubb Yusef terminates here in a rocky bluff, the face of which rises perpendicularly from the lake, leaving no space for a road or path along the shore. Consequently, the road from the south turns aside and goes up over the bluff, and descends again to the plain of 'Ain et Tabighah, which is farther east. The Fountain of the Fig-tree is very near the edge of the lake, and, when the water in that is high, would not be much above its level. Between the fountain and the lake there is a large marsh filled with reeds and papyrus (see page 313). This is the only place about the Sea of Galilee where the papyrus grows at present, and although it is being gradually displaced by the more hardy canes or reeds, still sufficient is left to form, when it is growing, a large and beautiful field of green. Besides Khan Minyeh, the papyrus is found now in Palestine only at Lake Huleh, the Merom of the Old Testament, where many acres are covered with a luxuriant growth of the same (see page 340). The tall slender stalks and graceful heads of this plant present a strange but attractive appearance, especially when a thicket of them rises directly from the surface of the water, which has overflowed to a considerable depth the ground where they stand. In the face of this bluff there is a wide trench cut in the rock, which is used now as a path, and horses and loaded animals slip and stumble when urged along its uneven bed. This was designed as an aqueduct to bring water from the fountain of Tabighah to the plain of Gennesaret, and many of the stones of which its walls were constructed are found with the cement still adhering to them (see page 313). This trench, according to our own measurements, is fifty-three feet above the surface of the lake. From this point the plain of Gennesaret is spread out before us like a vast garden (see page 311). Mejdel, at the farther end, and Tiberias, some miles below that, are in full view; while from the bluff above the fountain not only the southern end of the lake, but its entire