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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 312
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 312. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2520.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 312. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2520

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 312, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2520.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 312
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_331.jpg
Transcript 3i2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. have seized upon the patriots of Galilee, in view of the struggle before them. Yet, in spite of the gloomy prospect, they rallied in defence of the fatherland, and their efforts to drive back the invader are among the most heroic in the annals of war. To the ancient people of Palestine these hill-tops were sacred places, and here they erected their altars and practised the rites of their religion. The mountain-summits were also chosen as places of defence. If a peak, inaccessible by nature, could be capped by a fortress with strong walls, it was thought to afford the most secure place of refuge in times of danger. In these days the explorer or traveller is often surprised at the extent of the remains which he finds on some of these elevated points. Of this fact a good illustration is Kurn Surtubeh, which rises from the Jordan Valley a little west of the Damieh ford. It is an extremely difficult task to climb to the top of this peak, yet the summit is covered with massive ruins. How the stones were ever brought there remains a mystery. Galilee, the province with which we are now specially concerned, was renowned tor its strongholds. In the time of Joshua sixteen of the nineteen cities of Naphtali were "fortified" (Josh. xix. 35); and in the time of Josephus the list of fortresses is a long one, and some of them will be famous while the records of the Hebrew nation are preserved. Not the least among these strongholds was the castle at Safed (see pages 328 and 329). Of this place we have no ancient history, except that it is mentioned by Josephus, and in both the Jerusalem and the Babylonian Talmuds; yet, from what we know of the habits of the Jews and of the older inhabitants of the land, we can say that it is precisely such a point as would be selected for defence. The fact that Josephus repaired its walls shows that it had been used as a fortress from much earlier times; and indeed, beneath the masses of debris which now cover the hill, traces of walls appear which belong to the earliest remains of the country. The village itself is nearly two thousand eight hundred feet above the level of the Mediterranean, and is said to be the highest in Galilee. The peak, however, on which the castle stands rises considerably above the village, and the prospect, except to the north, is almost unlimited. The Horns of Hattin (see page 296), Tabor (see page 287), Mount Carmel (see page 286), and the intermediate country lie before us in the south ; to the south-east are the Gilead Hills and the Hauran Mountains; while to the east and north towards Damascus stretches the great plain of Bashan. But one of the most charming views on earth is the Sea of Galilee as beheld from this ancient castle. It appears to be at our very feet, although it is eight or ten miles away. It lies in a deep basin fully three thousand five hundred feet below where we are standing, and its surface is bright beneath the blue sky. Beautiful and quiet, and surrounded by picturesque hills, it has more the appearance of a work of art than of a natural lake; and one ceases to wonder at the extravagant praises bestowed upon it by the ancient Hebrews, since it was justly the pride of their land. The city of Tiberias is also in full view, although to reach it requires a journey of six