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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 306
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 306. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 306. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2514

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 306, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 306
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_325.jpg
Transcript 3o6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. of the country ever since the time of Hosea. Not only have the inhabitants of the region taken refuge in these vast caverns when war has desolated the land, but bands of outlaws have made them their hiding-place, whence they have issued forth to plunder the neighbouring villages and people. The account of the capture of these caves by Herod the Great, although we have no reason to doubt that it is veritable history, reads more like a romance. He had been appointed captain of Galilee by his father Antipater in the year 46 B.C., when he was twenty-five years of age, and his acts at that early period are characterized by the same energy and something of the same severity which marked his later career. In the year 40 B.C. he was appointed King of Judea by a decree from Rome, but did not gain full possession of his kingdom till the year 37 B.C. It was between these last dates, probably in the year 39 B.C., that his bold feat of subduing the robbers in these caves was accomplished. Through a snow-storm—an event which Orientals always regard with terror, and which is described as "sent of God," and hence must have been of unusual severity—Herod pushed his way from the south into Galilee and took Sepphoris (see page 286), where he found ample provisions for his army. He immediately sent a force against Arbela (see page 307), where " his opponents, who possessed at once military skill and brigand daring, met him in arms." A battle ensued, in which they were at first victorious; but Herod himself, having arrived on the scene, rallied his retreating forces and soon overcame the enemy and put them to flight. Josephus remarks that the caves were not then subdued, as " their reduction demanded time/' This is a significant statement, and affords a hint as to the character of this stronghold. Herod himself took personal direction of this important undertaking, and the task before him was no easy one. " To these caves opening on the face of mountain precipices there was no direct access" (see page 307). "The rock forming their front extended downward into ravines of prodigious depth," and, in order to reach them, "the king had recourse at length to a most hazardous contrivance." Great chests, strongly bound with iron, were let down from the edge of the mountain above, which proved to be a work of extreme difficulty and danger. " They were filled with armed men, who had long hooks in their hands, by which they might pull out such as resisted them and tumble them down and kill them by so doing." Being emboldened by their first successes, "the soldiers made repeated sallies into the mouths of the caves, where they slew many of the enemy, and then returned again to their chests." There was a great deal of combustible material in the caves, and the besiegers set this on fire, which aided them in their work of destruction. At last, the besieged being weakened in numbers, some of those that remained submitted to the king while others threw themselves down the precipice, and thus destroyed their lives rather than submit to the conqueror. A touching story is told of an old man, the father of seven children, who, with their mother, entreated him to go out and submit himself under Herod's pledge of protection, which he obstinately refused to do. " Hero , looking on from an eminence which commanded the spot, was overpowered by his feelmgs and extended his right hand to the old man, imploring him to spare his offspring. But he, unmoved by his exhortations, and even reproaching Herod for his abject birth, slaughter