Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 304
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 304. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 304. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2512

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 304, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 304
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_323.jpg
Transcript 3o4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. We have yet to speak of the remarkable prospect which the Horns of Hattin command. Without dwelling upon this in detail, it may be said that in the north and north-west Safed and Jebel esh Sheikh are the most prominent objects. We look down also upon the north end of the Sea of Galilee, Khan Minyeh, the plain of Gennesaret, Tell Hum, and the hills beyond, which distinctly appear (see pages 297 and 303); while to the south stretches the plain called Ard el Hamma, and to the west, towards the northern end of Carmel and the Mediterranean, the great plain of El Buttauf, of which the most noticeable features from a distance are the vast olive-groves which skirt its borders and occupy some of its more fertile portions. The distance from the base of Hattin to Tiberias is about one hour and forty-five minutes. Just below the village of Hattin there is a small and finely-cultivated plain extending to the north-west, and also to the south-east towards the Sea of Galilee. After the crops are gathered, the weeds take possession of the soil and grow with surprising vigour. The beds of great thistles sometimes cover many acres, and when they have reached their full growth, and especially when they have become ripe, it is impossible to drive an animal through them. A person standing on the summit or slopes of Hattin, and looking across this plain towards the Sea of Galilee, would never suspect that it drops almost perpendicularly at some points to a depth of more than one thousand feet. The edge of the plain, which is outlined against the water of the lake, is seen to be broken at one point, and on either side the tops of perpendicular cliffs appear. Still, one has no conception of the gorge or chasm which exists here until he has crossed the plain and begins to descend, attracted by the smooth and beautiful surface of the Sea of Galilee below. Through this gorge led in ancient times one of the main highways of the country, and the camel trains from Esdraelon and the south to Damascus follow it to-day. This is also the direct road between Nazareth and Capernaum, and consequently we are on ground over which our Saviour passed. The path is neither rough nor difficult, and, as we descend, the cliffs rise higher and higher on either hand, and we perceive that the walls of rock are perforated with holes. This is called Wady el Hamam, or the Valley of Pigeons, and myriads of them make their home in these rocks (see Page 3°5)- But these innocent and beautiful birds are not the only ones that frequent these wild and savage cliffs. All kinds of birds of prey, such as the raven, the eagle, and the vulture, have here their nests. Indeed, one might be in doubt whether it could not be called the Valley of Vultures as appropriately as the Valley of Pigeons. The griffon-vulture, which abounds here, is an immense bird, with its head and part of its neck bald, and measures when the wings are spread eight feet four inches, and sometimes more. From tip of beak to tip of tail they measure three feet four inches, iim\ in some instances more than that. We have often seen large numbers of them soaring so far above the valley that they looked no bigger than common sparrows, and seemed like mere specks in the sky. As might be supposed, numerous wild animals now make their dens in these caves. The cliffs, with the excavations in them, have played an important part in the history